Archive: Nov 2014

THE BONNIE SEW-ALONG #4 – SLEEVES & SIDE SEAMS ( ALL VIEWS )

  And we’re back! And because Bonnie is such a quick and easy make we’re on the home stretch of the  sew-along. Yay! If you need a refresher or are just joining in, you can find the last sew-along posts here. Or if you need to …

read more

BACK IN THE SADDLE!

Yee haw! We finished moving everything back where it belongs and I got to return to my studio. FINALLY. I had two projects that have been in process since we started our renovations, and I finally got to finish them.First up, another pair of Marcy…

read more

Back home

Of course it feels good to be back home again, but it was almost sad to say goodbye to everyone this morning. These were wonderful days with a fabulous group of ladies. To finish off my blog posts about this event a few of the garments as they were thi…

read more

November Indie Pattern Update!

I don’t know about you but I’ve been diving headfirst into winter sewing this month so have been keeping my eyes peeled for new patterns which could be a good addition to my cold weather wardrobe. I’m toying with the idea of making a coat…anyone got …

read more

Amanda vs McCalls 6552 Kaftan

One of the clearest memories I have as a kid is going to a primary school dance wearing my Mum’s 70s kaftan, hem stapled up, and crazy dancing like a boss. That kaftan was thing of beauty- an awesome border print featuring mandalas and paisley in those subdued cream/orange/yellow/brown colours of the time. But mostly […]

read more

Lingerie patterns inspiration

I chose to start the week with some lingerie sewing patterns. When you’ve been sewing all your clothes for some time (it’s been more than 2 years since I bought my last RTW garment), you feel like it would be so great if you could also sew your own lingerie, at least I do. 
Lingerie and accesories (shoes, bags, jewels) are the only things I don’t make, and if I knew how, I sure would make my own. I’ve been reading posts about making your bra and linegerie set, and after so much procrastinating, I decided I should probably start with something easy, no underwire or complicated cups.

I wear almost exclusively triangle bras and bralettes, which is a great point as the bras without underwire are easier to fit and make. 
Here is a slection of patterns I really like and want to try:

Let’s start with Burda magazine. The last issue (December 2014, third picture) has an amazing collection of loungewear patterns and makes me want to make all the pretty pajamas and sets.
2. bustier and panties (january 2012)
3. bralette and knickers (december 2014)

Amy from the blog Cloth Habit has just released this beautiful set. I love the longline bra shape and her versions are so pretty. And she’s going to organize a sew-along in January, always a nice feature!

Ohhh Lulu has me drooling everytime she posts a picture of one of her handmade sets on Instagram, so naturally her patterns are on that list of inspiration. Again, love the longline! The other sets also have amazing details.
What about you? Do you make your own lingerie?
If you have any recommendations for nice lingerie patterns or fabric/notions shops, please let me know!

.

He decidido empezar esta semana con patrones de lenceria. Cuando una cose la totalidad de sus prendas (hace ya más de 2 años que no compro ropa en tiendas), piensa también “¿Y si me cosia también la ropa interior?”. Pues por lo menos yo me lo pregunto muy a menudo, jeje.
Lo unico que no me hago es lenceria y los accesorios (zapatos, bolsos), y eso porque no sé hacerlo! Pero ya basta con excusas! Aunque no veo posible lo de los zapatos, la ropa interior me parece mucho más alcanzable. Después de leer blogs sobre el tema, me he decidido a probar con algo sencillo, sin ballenas ni copas complicadas.

Casi siempre llevo sujetadores de triángulo sin ballenas, lo que me vale porque son más fácil de hacer ๐Ÿ˜‰
Aquí están los patrones que más me gustan y que intentaré hacer:

Estos modelos son de la revista Burda. El último número (diciembre 2014) tiene una colección de modelos de pijamas, camisetas y ropa interior que me encanta.
3. sujetador y panty (12/2014)

Amy del blog Cloth Habit acaba de sacar este conjunto tan mono. Me gusta mucho el sujetador largo y en su blog, podéis ver varias pruebas con colores muy bonitos. Ademas, en enero ha previsto hacer un Cose-Conmigo!
 
 

Sigo a Ohhh Lulu en Instagram y cada foto que publica me deja bocabierta. Entonces, normal que sus patrones están aquí. Tienen un aire retro que me gusta mucho.


¿Y vosotras? ¿Haceis vuestra propia ropa interior?
Si conocéis otros patrones bonitos o tiendas donde venden el material/tela especifica para lenceria, no dudais en compartirlo en los comentarios. ¡Gracias!

.

Je commence donc cette semaine en parlant lingerie. Parce que comme couturière qui n’a rien acheté de prêt-à-porter depuis plus de 2 ans, j’ai très envie de pousser le vice jusqu’au bout et de me coudre aussi ma lingerie. Bon pour ce qui est chaussures et sacs, j’ai abandonné l’espoir de pouvoir les réaliser moi-même par contre…
Du coup, pour me mettre tranquillement aux sous-vêtements, j’ai décidé de choisir des modèles simples. Ça tombe bien car je ne porte quasiment que des soutiens-gorges triangles sans armature (et oui, c’est un avantage des petites poirtines, le support nécessaire est minime).

Voici donc une sélection des modèles qui m’ont tapé dans l’oeil:

Chez madame Burda, j’ai trouvé de jolis modèles qui ont l’air plutôt simple. Si vous avez le dernier numéro (décembre 2014), il y a une collection de pyjamas, nuisettes et ensembles de lingerie super jolie. J’ai craqué sur tous les modèles (et c’est chose rare!).
1. ensemble bicolore (07/2013)
3. triangle et shorty (12/2014)

Amy du blog Cloth Habit vient de sortir le patron de cet ensemble qui me plait énormément. Allez jeter un coup d’oeil sur son blog: ses versions colorées sont magnifiques et en plus, elle organise un Sew-Along en janvier.

Je suis Ohhh Lulu sur Instagram et à chaque fois qu’elle publie une photo d’un de ses ensembles, je reste bouche-bée devant leur beauté. C’est donc naturellement que ses patrons se retrouvent dans la liste. Leur style rétro est bien sûr un gros coup de coeur.

Et vous, vous faites votre lingerie? Vous avez des patrons préférés?
Surtout n’hésitez pas à me donner le nom d’autres patrons et de boutiques où trouver tissu et matériel spécifiques. Merci!

.

read more

The Secret Lives of Teachers

Now that I spend so many hours a day (and night) sitting around feeding SHB, I’ve had lots of time to read random articles on my phone (I would rather read actual books, but my local library has an abundance of giant hardbacks, and reading in the dark …

read more

Canterbury โ€“ part three

Our sewcation together is almost over, one evening to go and tomorrow morning it’s an English breakfast (by tradition), cleaning up and going back home.

Who would have thought November 29 would be such a glorious day.

DSC_0933 DSC_0942DSC_0937

A photo from outside in, it’s quite a sewing ‘mess’.

DSC_0935

Marta in a top she’s not happy with. a Vogue pattern that did not work as expected/hoped. Several of us tried it on but it díd not do a lot of good on any of us. Unfortunatuely trashed….

DSC_0944

I’ve been working on a jacket again. This time I’m using a bouclé fabric I bought years ago and has been waiting in my closet as I was too afraid of sewing it into a wadder or to the amount of time it would take to make it. I always intended to make a more or less French (Chanel) jacket from it which as most of you know is taking a lot of hand sewing and a huge amount of time. Recently I realised that I’m not that much attracted to follow the exact construction of such a classic jacket, nor do I want the classic neckline or trim. It just does not suit me and I would not wear the jacket. No use putting that amount of time into it then. Being me I am using my own vision on how I want it to be and how I want to construct it. Basically I wanted to try the quilted lining, not all the other details.

DSC_0915 DSC_0916 DSC_0918

I decided early on I wanted a lapel collar and drafted the pattern I used for my brown jacket slightly. The muslins collar is more narrow than the final garment. The sleeves are changed to a 3 piece sleeve. In this way the vent will be more visible.

 

Front piece interfaced (quilted) with silk oranza, added roll line and a stay tape at the edge.

 DSC_0945     

The collar, one side done with the trim showing between the layers. It has a little sparkle that’s a bit outside my comfort zone but I quite like it.

DSC_0948

 DSC_0947

It won’t be finished today, though I hope to at least sew the other collar. I did quilt the lining and most of its seamlines still have to be sewn. That I will do by hand.

I can heartily recommend a sewcation like this, spending a few days with likeminded people. You should have seen a couple of us this morning: risen early and cutting patterns, sewing in our pj’s. No one but sewing friends will understand that. No photos of that though ๐Ÿ˜‰

read more

Top 5 Craftsy class picks for up to $19 during Black Friday Sale

I try not to write too many Craftsy promotion posts, but this is the sale you can’t miss. It’s the Black Friday Sale, readers, and it lasts only until Monday! The sale I was waiting for myself to purchase a few new classes for less than a half of the initial price.

It seems only a few sewing classes were added since in the past three months. However, those few classes that were added are really

read more

Anita Ponti Pants OF JOY!

Normally when I make something that is a wadder I ditch it almost ASAP – either to a charity if it’s wearable, or in the bin if it’s beyond all help. I am the opposite of a hoarder! For some reason I hung on to my Anita Pants of Broken Hearts as I felt…

read more

THE BONNIE SEW-ALONG #3 – START SEWING!

Welcome  back to the Bonnie sew-along!Today we start sewing up our Bonnie’s so hopefully you’ve got your sizes sorted, traced your pattern, picked, prepped and cut out your fabrics and are ready to go!If you need a refresher or are just joining in…

read more

THE BONNIE SEW-ALONG #3 – START SEWING!

Welcome  back to the Bonnie sew-along!Today we start sewing up our Bonnie’s so hopefully you’ve got your sizes sorted, traced your pattern, picked, prepped and cut out your fabrics and are ready to go!If you need a refresher or are just joining in…

read more

Black Pencil Skirt

Worn here with my Belcarra in Black CrepeSometimes you just need to drop everything and sew yourself a black pencil skirt. Fortunately when this thought struck me I found a black drill in my stash and the skirt portion of a pattern I’d already use…

read more

Five and Ten Designs Sale

It’s Black Friday, and that means there’s a Holiday Thank You Sale at Five and Ten Designs.  These sales are rare, so this is a great time to get the Volume One & Two eBooks at this discounted price.Here’s the most recent creation I’ve made us…

read more

Canterbury โ€“ part two

We are having such fun. There really is nothing like spending time with friends with the same hobby.
Here is Viv, our style icon :), working on a coat inspired by a Burberry one. I can tell you hers will be a great knock off.
01c17f1df64e2d22266982986ff52302f6c10ddb57image
Van Gogh in the background, Breughel on the skirt. Lista helping with pinning the hem.
019a38c06e90fcb494e837645532e810b1465ff5d8 01d400f7ee35bb54908d71d4e4ea3e32fdfe692dac
Other projects in progress. Valerie, if you want a fashion show, be sure to be there next year!! I will post a few more pictures though during the next days.

I got stuck in my project this afternoon and before continuing I thought it best to take a run. From the place we are at to Canterbury cathedral and back (about 5 km in total). With this gorgeous sight just after dusk.
019bb9a14960fe2cba7e87a428da286905997caba2
Yesterday evening, part of the group.
DSC_0870
And one of the highlights of the weekend: the ugly fabric swap. The fabric Joana is holding got the ‘prize’ for the ugliest fabric. If you could only feel the texture and material….

 DSC_0866 DSC_0858 DSC_0856 DSC_0823 DSC_0827 DSC_0830 DSC_0840  DSC_0842 DSC_0848 DSC_0849 DSC_0854 DSC_0835

read more

ยท Sale this Weekend! ยท

I hope you are all having a lovely Thanksgiving weekend!  We had a wonderful day with family yesterday, and I’m looking forward to decorating our house for Christmas this weekend and finally breaking out the Christmas music. ๐Ÿ™‚ This past wee…

read more

Aprovechar comprando barato en Black Friday


Holaaaaaa a tod@s!!! Esta semana he estado trabajando en un proyecto súper importante que ya os contaré más adelante, pero a ver si hoy entrego la primera parte y ya me quedo más liberada para dar más guerra con los tutoriales por aquí!!



Hoy es Black Friday en EEUU y, cada vez más, se está extendiendo este tipo de celebraciones por el mundo. Para aquellas que no conozcáis esta celebración os explico un poco resumido de qué va este día. No soy una experta en la materia, pero sí que tuve la oportunidad de vivir esta fecha tan señalada en EEUU, durante el año que estuve viviendo en San Francisco.


Seguro que os suena la cena de “Thanksgiving” (Acción de Gracias), es la típica noche de película en la que se reúne la familia como si se tratara del día de Navidad y se suele comer pavo relleno, beans (judías), puré de patatas, mermelada de arándanos… Y a mayores, lo que cada uno en su casa quiera comer!!! Esta cena se suele celebrar el último jueves de noviembre y el motivo es dar las gracias y aquí si que es verdad, que el agradecimiento es personal de cada uno.


Cuando se termina de cenar se suele ir pronto a la cama, porque esa misma noche, la noche del jueves al viernes ya comienzan las mejores rebajas del país. Las tiendas, comercios y centros comerciales suelen abrir desde las 3 ó 4 de la madrugada, y las mejores ofertas se encuentran en las primeras horas. Es decir, por ejemplo H&M comienza con rebajas del 70% desde las 4 a.m hasta las 6 a.m, luego del 50 desde las 6 a.m hasta las 8 a.m y finalmente se queda con sus rebajas del 30% ya en adelante. Digamos que es el comienzo oficial de las rebajas en EEUU. 



Se llama Black Friday porque los números negativos suelen ser números en color rojo, mientras que los números positivos (o ganancias) suelen aparecer en las cuentas corrientes como números negros. Esta noche, la noche del viernes que dan comienzo las rebajas de Navidad, es el día en el que EEUU tiene las mayores ventas del año, y por lo tanto los número son positivos esta noche gracias a las ganancias de los comercios. 


Aprovechando el Black Friday, algunas marcas comerciales se están haciendo eco de este día y están aplicando muy buenos descuentos a sus productos, pero sólo este día. Este tipo de ofertas a mí me vienen fenomenal, porque los regalos que iba a comprar en Navidad, los puedo comprar hoy y me ahorro un dineral!!!!


Además, para todas aquellas que quieran comprarse una buena MÁQUINA DE COSER, hoy es el mejor momento!!!!! 


Por ejemplo, Shopty es una tienda online de máquinas de coser, bordadoras, overlock y mercería. Yo he fichado algunos productos que os pueden interesar, por ejemplo, máquinas de coser SINGER buenas y económicas para principiantes.


O para aquellas que van avanzando y quieren dar un paso más, y adquirir una máquina de coser más profesional y con mejores prestaciones, también tienen distintas ofertas.


También tienen muy buenos precios en remalladoras y en bordadoras.


Y aquí va lo que yo me he apuntado para mi pequeño taller, y que estaba deseando comprar uno… ESTE SÚPER MANIQUÍ SINGER regulable!!!! Me encanta, y la verdad que aunque parezca caro está genial de precio ๐Ÿ˜€


Y además, aprovechando que es Black Friday puedes conseguirlas a un 10% de descuento si te animas a cuponizar tus compras, es decir a usar un cupón de descuento de CupoNation; en 30 segundos y sin registros habrás ahorrado ๐Ÿ™‚

Os dejo, que me quitan mi maniquí!!!!! 

UN BESAZO ENORME ๐Ÿ˜€

SÍGUEME EN 

Siguenos en Facebook Síguenos en Twitter Siguenos en Google+ Siguenos en YouTube Siguenos en Blogger Follow on Bloglovin
www.ohmotherminediy.com
read more

How to tie a vintage style turban

Lately, I’ve taken a liking to using scarves to tie my hair up on a bad hair day. On a recent photo set, Emileigh asked if I could do a tutorial for this turban style, and here we are today.Now this simple tutorial can help you save yourself from a dre…

read more

Paris Windows Part #2: Trend Spotting

Trends Reflected in Paris WindowsKeeping an eye out for what catches my eye, I take photos instinctively, and not always of something that I personally ‘like’.     In sorting out the photos from this past month in Paris, certain trends e…

read more

Sewing weekend

It’s that time of the year again, we are having a sewing weekend! We loved the venue we went to last year so much that we went there again. We are spending 4 days in Canterbury with 9 sewing friends (10 on Saturday, Pauline, so sorry you can only make the one day). The group could have been a bit larger, we are sadly missing a few ladies who for various reasons could not make it this year (we MISS you ladies!!).

The house has ample space for >10 sewing machines and sergers, apart from the other practical things as two stoves, enough bedrooms etc. Yesterday we all arrrived and today we were up early and started sewing, pattern tracing, unpicking a loved garment to re-create it etc. There is no general plan, we just work on that what we want to do or want help with. No worries about at which time the rest of the family comes home, shopping, laundry and other obligations. Just the fun of sewing together, helping each other, talking about all things sewing related as well as other subjects that come up.

It’s wet weather, which adds to the good feeling of sewing inside the house.

DSC_0804

A little impression. I do hope to show a few finished projects later. And will have a few pictures of my muslin and a dress I finished last week but have not blogged about because the lack of photos.

In the evening, machines not yet working, but ready to start.

DSC_0802

DSC_0818  DSC_0816 DSC_0813  DSC_0808   DSC_0791 DSC_0789

Inspiration all over the place, this is only a very little bit of all we brought in.

DSC_0786

I’m trying on a top made by Joana, definitely copying it. She’s wearing a StyleArc top.

DSC_0785

This is what I’m working on, details later.

DSC_0812

read more

Olivia + Giveaway winner

Hello!!Well now, I know I said I was going to announce the winner of the Make and Mend Fabulous give-away yesterday, but I got home a little late after attending my friends end of year Design Exhibition and after a happy amount of free wine, I may or m…

read more

Happy Thanksgiving!

Want to wish everyone a Very Happy Thanksgiving today.   Remember that today and everyday you have many things you should be grateful for, even if you believe you don’t.   I am grateful to be able to express myself…
Read more

read more

All Spice!

Today it’s Thanksgiving for me and mine, and I have so very, very much to be thankful for.  And like my fellow Americans everywhere, I have plans to spend the day with family eating comfort food all day long.  As a special fun treat, today’s featured pattern has a culinary link:  The All Spice Dress by Paisley Roots

If you follow Karly from Paisley Roots, you know her designs are unique

read more

Norah Gaughan Cabled Vest

Norah Gaughan Knitted Vest

Norah Gaughan Cabled Vest

Norah Gaughan Cabled Vest
        It’s cold … I’m knitting …         … besides, I’m swamped with work and if it’s ok to knit for half an hour – it’s pretty frustrating to sew (arrrgh).         Very warm, this vest designed by Norah Gaughan and published in Vogue Knitting Fall 2010, features exploded asymmetrical heart cables travelling up the front panels past the shoulders and around the neck.
        It has an hourglass shape emphasised by the back-waist ribbing and an I-cord belt.

Norah Gaughan Cabled VestNorah Gaughan Cabled Vest

        The pattern has a generous ease amount because it’s meant as outerwear so I cast-on a size S (btw Vogue offers finished measurements). It has a difficulty rating of 3 (intermediate) but it’s pretty quick to knit with the super bulky yarn and all, and I did not find the cables very difficult. Maybe the most challenging part about this pattern is closing the shawl collar at the back neck.

Norah Gaughan Cabled VestNorah Gaughan Cabled Vest

        The recommended yarn is Berocco Peruvia Quick difficult to find in Italy so I substituted with Rowan Big Wool which made the whole thing a bit more heavy but also more warm.         RECAP         Pattern: Norah Gaughan Cabled Vest         Fiber: Merino Wool 100% – Rowan Big Wool         Ravelry : http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fruitsflowers/21-cabled-vest

Knitted Cabled Vest
Knitted Cabled Vest

        I’m very pleased with it especially because I can wear it paired with one of my felt fedoras (I must confess I’m a compulsive hat buyer) and I think it’s a look that works. Do you agree?

Knitted Cabled Vest

        I’m curious to know what do you choose to do when you have very little time for crafting: sew, knit, bake …? How do you organise your time?

Thank you for visiting. I would love to hear your opinion.

Gilè a trecce Norah Gaughan

Knitted Cabled Vest
        Fa freddo … sto knittando (scusate il termine ma a dire lavorare la maglia ai ferri s’invecchia) …         Ultimamente sono sommersa da lavoro e se si può knitttare mezz’oretta – cucire lo trovo frustrante (arrrgh).         Questo caldo gilè disegnato da Norah Gaughan e pubblicato in Vogue Knitting Fall 2010 è caratterizzato da trecce a cuore esplose in asimmetrico che decorano i pannelli frontali passano la linea delle spalle e si congiungono dietro il collo.
        Ha una linea a clessidra enfatizzata dalle coste lungo la vita dietro e un cinturino I-cord.

Gilè a trecce Norah GaughanGilè a trecce Norah Gaughan

        Il modello ha una vestibilità ampia essendo inteso come capo esterno perciò ho avviato una S (cmq Vogue stampa anche le dimensioni del capo finito). Nonostante il livello difficoltà 3 (intermedia), il modello si lavora piuttosto velocemente anche perché si utilizza un filato “super bulky”. Non ho trovato le trecce molto difficili… la parte più complicata secondo me è la chiusura dietro del collo a scialle.

Gilè a trecce Norah GaughanGilè a trecce Norah Gaughan

        Il filato consigliato dall’autrice è Berocco Peruvia Quick piuttosto difficile da trovare in Italia perciò l’ho sostituito con Rowan Big Wool (distribuito dalla Coats) che ha reso il capo leggermente più pesante ma anche più caldo.         RECAP
        Modello: Gilè a trecce Norah Gaughan
        Filato: Lana Merino 100% – Rowan Big Wool
        Ravelry: http://www.ravelry.com/projects/fruitsflowers/21-cabled-vest

Gilè a trecce
Gilè a trecce

        Sono molto contenta del risultato specialmente perché riesco ad abbinarlo con uno dei miei cappelli in feltro (devo confessare che ho una passione smodata per i cappelli) è questo penso sia un look che funziona. Non siete d’accordo?

Gilè a trecce

        Sono curiosa di sapere cosa scegliete di fare quando avete poco tempo a disposizione per il “craftting” (altra parola non ortodossa). Cucite, lavorate la maglia, cucinate …? Come vi organizzate il tempo?

Grazie della visita. Mi piacerebbe moltissimo sentire la vostra opinione.

read more

Tutorial: how to sew a right-angle seam

Today, I’ll share with you a tutorial I wrote for Craftsy on right-angle seams. 

If you ever had to sew a right-angled seam, you know how difficult it can be to get a neat and flat corner without any pluckers. As a pattern designer, it’s always a challenge to explain these complex steps with easy-to-understand illustrations.
The Malvarosa dress has drop shoulders with right-angle seams, and I know that it’s the most feared step of an otherwise relatively easy pattern. But, fear this step no more!

Here are two different methods for stitching these right-angle seams: one you can use on normal fabrics and the other for more delicate and fraying fabrics.

Method 1: For “normal” fabric

Use this method if you have a normal fabric (not prone to fray excessively or very delicate). It’s the easiest one and will give you very nice results. But I would still recommend making a test version first :-) 
1. Here are your 2 pieces of fabric, right sides facing up. Seam allowances will depend of your pattern (usually 5/8″).
2. Pin the side together. As you can see, the top edges don’t meet: You should have about twice the seam allowance length overlapping the corner.
3. Stitch until the apex point (where the seam allowances meet) using short stitches.
4. Carefully, clip the seam allowance up to the stitching line, (snip into just the bottom layer, the one with the angle in).
5. Pin the other sides together. You can see how it looks from both sides. Pivot the angle at the apex point so the edges meet and pin.
Stitch the other side until you reach the apex (make sure not to stitch over the fabic “fold”, the two lines of stitches will meet at the corner).
6. Press the seams to the outside. Here is the right side: if you see a little plucker like here, you can clip carefully a little bit closer to the stitches from the wrong side.

Method 2: For delicate fabrics

As you can see with the previous sewing method, we were clipping first into the seam allowances and then stitching very close to the edge. But with a delicate fabric or one fraying easily, it wouldn’t be possible to get a nice corner seam. So we’re going to use a piece of organza to create new seam allowances, similar to what you would do to sew gussets.
1. Pin a piece of organza over the inside angle, on the right side of the fabric. Make sure the apex point is covered (this is where the seam allowances meet).
2. Stitch the organza around the angle, pivoting at the apex. Clip both layers diagonally into the corner, as close as possible to the stitches.
3. Press the organza to the inside, folding it on the stitches line.
4. Pin the outer angle to the inner angle, using the piece of organza to lay both layers flat against each other. As you can see, the organza seam allowances will allow you to stitch easily into the corner. Stitch, pivoting at the corner.
5. Press the seam allowances to the outside. From the right side and from the wrong side of the fabric.
Right-angle seams are mostly featured as style lines as they don’t usually give any shaping like a princess seam or a dart. But used as a gusset, they serve both purpose: interesting design lines and pattern making functionality. You should definitely give them a try!

.

Hoy voy a compartir con vosotras un tutorial que escribi para Craftsy.
Si ya habéis cosido una costura con ángulo, sabéis que puede resultar dificil obtener una esquina perfecta, sin pliegues. Como diseñadora de patrones, siempre es algo complicado poder explicar claramente con un eschema los pasos más complejos como este, por eso un tutorial con foto me parece mejor.
El vestido Malvarosa tiene unas mangas caídas con costuras en ángulo recto, y sé que es un paso que os miedo incluso si el resto del patrón es bastante sencillo.

Os voy a enseñar dos metodos para coser las costuras con ángulo: uno se puede usar con cualquier tela y el otro es más recomendado para telas delicadas o que se deshilan muy fácilmente.

Metodo 1: para telas “normales”

Este metodo es perfecto para la mayoria de telas. Es el más fácil, tiene buenos resultados pero os recomiendo hacer una prueba antes :-) 
1. Aquí teneis las dos piezas, con el derecho hacia arriba. Los márgenes de costuras dependen del patrón, normalmente 1,5 cm.
2. Prender uno de los lados. Como se puede apreciar, los cantos superiores no coinciden: la diferencia entre los cantos tiene que ser de 2 veces la medida de los márgenes más o menos.
3. Pespuntear hasta el punto de pivot (donde los márgenes deberian coincidir, aquí a 1,5 cm por encima del canto) con una puntada corta.
4. Con cuidado, cortar el margen en bies hasta la línea de pespunte, o punto de pivot.
5. Prender el otro lado. Aquí podéis ver como quedan el derecho y el reves. Pivotear en el ángulo en el punto de pivot para hacer coincidir los cantos.
Pespuntear hasta el punto de pivot (no pespuntear sobre el “pliegue”, las dos líneas de pesunte deben coincidir en la esquina). 
6. Planchar los márgenes hacia fuera. Os enseño el derecho: si hay un plieguecito, podéis cortar el margen un poco más cerca del puto de pivot. 

Metodo 2: para telas delicadas

En el primer metodo, se corta el margen antes de coser el ángulo por completo. Pero si vais a usar una tela muy fina o que se deshila mucho, os recomiendo usar un trocito de organza para crear un refuerzo.
1. Prender una pieza pequeña de organza sobre el ángulo interior, en el derecho de la tela. Asegurarse que el punto de pivot está cubierto (donde los márgenes se encuentran).
2. Pespuntear siguiendo la forma del ángulo (sobre la línea de pespunte). Dar un corte en diagonal dentro del ángulo, cortando las dos telas.
3. Planchar el organza hacia dentro, doblandole sobre las líneas de pespunte.
4. Prender los ángulos, usando el organza como esquina. El organza os permite coser en la esquina con más facilidad y da refuerzo en esta zona. Pespuntear, pivoteando en la esquina.
5. Planchar los márgenes hacia fuera.ress the seam allowances to the outside. Desde el derecho y el reves de la tela.
Las costuras con ángulo recto se usan a menudo como diseño o estilo, no suelen dar forma como una costura princesa o una pinza. Pero segun la forma del ángulo, más o menos abierto, pueden también dar comodidad y funcionabilidad. ¡Os recomiendo probarlas! 

.

Aujourd’hui je partage avec vous un tuto que j’ai écris pour Craftsy sur les coutures à angle droit.
 
Si vous avez déjà cousu des coutures à angle droit, vous savez à quel point ça peut être difficile d’obtenir des angles nets sans faux-pli. Comme créatrice de patrons, c’est aussi difficile d’expliquer ces étapes complexes par des illustrations, aussi détaillées qu’elles soient, donc un petit tuto photo est toujours le bienvenu .
Le patron de la robe Malvarosa possède des emmanchures marteau qui doivent être montée avec cette couture en angle droit et je sais que c’est une des étapes les plus redoutées, alors que le patron est plutôt simple. 

Voici deux méthodes pour coudre sans problème ces angles: une qui peut être utilisée pour quaiment tous les tissus et l’autre spéciale pour les tissus délicats et qui s’effile facilement.

Méthode 1: pour tous types de tissu

Cette méthode est parfaite pour les tissus basiques. Vous obtiendrez de beaux angles et en plus elle est simple à réaliser. Enfin une petite version d’essai avant ne fait pas de mal :-) 
1. Voici vos deux pièces, endroit vers vous. Les marges dépendent de votre patron, pour la Malvarosa elles sont d’1,5 cm et comprises dans le patron.
2. Épingler les côtés ensemble. Comme vous pouvez voir, le bord supérieur dépasse: il doit y avoir un surplus qui correspond à deux longueurs de marge environ (ici 3 cm).
3. Piquer jusqu’au point de pivot (où les marges se rejoignent) avec un point court. 
4. Avec minutie, cranter la marge en diagonal jusqu’au pivot.
5. Épingler l’autre côté. Faire pivoter la pièce pour les côtés coïncident.
Piquer jusqu’au pivot en faisant attention à ne pas coudre sur le “pli” du tissu. Les deux lignes de couture se rejoignent au centre du point de pivot.
6. Repasser les marges vers l’extérieur. Si vous voyez des petits plis sur l’endroit, vous pouvez toujours cranter la marge un peu plus près de la ligne de couture.

Méthode 2: pour les tissus fragiles

Avec la première méthode, nous avons cranter les marges directement et ensuite piquer l’angle. Mais avec un tissu fragile ou qui s’effile, il y a un risque que le cran s’aggrandisse ou se déforme. Nous allons donc coudre une pièce d’organza pour stabiliser et renforcer la zone de pivot. 
1. Épingler un morceau d’organza à l’angle intérieur, sur l’endroit du tissu. S’assurer que le point de pivot soit bien recouvert (le point où les marges se rencontrent). 
2. Piquer l’organza le long de l’angle, sur la ligne de couture (ici à 1,5 cm du bord) en pivotant sur le point de pivot. Cranter en diagonal les deux épaisseurs de tissu dans l’angle, le plus près possible de la couture. 
3. Repasser l’organza vers l’intérieur en le pliant sur les lignes de couture.
4. Épingler ensembles les deux pièces en utilisant l’organza comme angle. Les marges de l’organza vont aider à piquer le plus près possible du pivot. L’angle est donc renforcé.
Piquer en pivotant à l’angle.
5. Repasser les marges vers l’extérieur. Une vue de l’endroit et de l’envers du tissu.
Les coutures à angle droit sont le plus souvent utilisée comme couture de style car elles permettent rarement de façonner des courbes comme les découpes princesse ou les pinces. Mais elles peuvent aussi être employées comme gousset (avec la pièce d’organza) et ainsi apporter un détail stylistique et de la fonctionnalité et de l’aisance. 
J’espère que vous essayerez cette technique! 

.

read more

This is why we never go to restaurants

Blurry photo to match the haze of parenting these three.For her birthday, Sienna asked to go out for dinner to a restaurant. This type of request is not ever undertaken lightly. We very rarely do this as we know that children + any eating establishment…

read more

THE BONNIE SEW-ALONG #2


Welcome back to the Bonnie  sew-along.

If you are joining in don’t forget to join the Facebook sew-along group where you’ll find all the sew along posts, feel free to post your Bonnie progress shots, ask any questions you may have as well as take a peek at what others are sewing. You can also follow along on Instagram and Twitter  just use hashtag #bonniesewalong.
Choosing your fabric
Recommended fabrics for Bonnie are stable light-medium weight jersey/knit fabrics such as merino wool, sweater knits, jerseys, cotton blends etc. As usual you can find this list on the back of the pattern envelope. You just need to keep in mind the stretch 40%-50% that the pattern is recommended for. Yesterday’s sew-along post i briefly touched on the topic of sewing with good quality knit fabrics for Bonnie or any other knit pattern you plan on sewing up so keep this mind too when out fabric shopping.

Some of the fabric i used i  sourced locally at some of  the below places:

 
These all have a great selection of knit fabrics.

If you’re already a knit fabric hoarder then you probably already have your favorite places to buy awesome knit fabric, if you do and would like to share them feel free to leave a comment below so we build a resource list together… 
That’s if you want to share your gems ๐Ÿ™‚


Supplies & Tools you’ll need

Back to yesterday’s post again, i listed a few of the tools and supplies you need to have to sew up knit fabrics, these also apply to sewing up the Bonnie pattern.

* Main fabric

* Matching Thread*2 1/2 yards of 1/4” (6mm) clear plastic tape
* Ball point needles
*Optional: Twin needle for hemming
*Optional: Ribbing fabric for neckband & waistband
* Pins
* Pattern weights
*Rotary cutter and Self healing mat ( optional)
* Tracing paper & Pencil
* Sharpie/Marker

And obviously your copy of the Bonnie pattern ( Paper or PDF) ready to go. 
You can pick up a copy here.

CHOOSE YOUR SIZE  
Choosing you size for Bonnie is just the same as if you would pick your size for a woven pattern. Simply measure your Bust, waist and hips.


Bust measurement: Measure around the fullest point of your bust, wearing whatever type of bra or undergarment you plan on wearing under your Bonnie sweater. 
Waist measurement: Is at your natural waist. On many people this is the smallest point of your torso.

 Hip measurement: The fullest part of your hips and butt. Typically this is approximately 7″ below your natural waist, but this differs on everyone. This measurement isn’t too important on the Odette dress due to the skirt being flared and skimming over the hips and butt, make measure it anyway just to be on the safe side.
You may need a hand and  have someone help you take your measurements, especially the bust,  as having your arms up and holding the tape can affect the measurement slightly.
 I ran through choosing your sizing, dealing with being in between sizes, tracing your pattern and whole heap of other tips in the previous Odette sew-along i ran here on the blog. To save this post being super long and wordy you can check out this post and read up on all this info in more detail, if you need to. Read up on prepping and cutting out your fabric here as well if you need to.
If you need some inspiration for your Bonnie then check out the Pinterest Board I’ve set up with some lovely stuff in it.  Feel free to add your own Bonnie inspiration too.


Abby
x


Gather up all your fabric, tools and supplies, choose your size, trace your pattern, prep and  cut out your fabric cause we will be start to sew up our Bonnie’s tomorrow!
read more

THE BONNIE SEW-ALONG #2


Welcome back to the Bonnie  sew-along.

If you are joining in don’t forget to join the Facebook sew-along group where you’ll find all the sew along posts, feel free to post your Bonnie progress shots, ask any questions you may have as well as take a peek at what others are sewing. You can also follow along on Instagram and Twitter  just use hashtag #bonniesewalong.
Choosing your fabric
Recommended fabrics for Bonnie are stable light-medium weight jersey/knit fabrics such as merino wool, sweater knits, jerseys, cotton blends etc. As usual you can find this list on the back of the pattern envelope. You just need to keep in mind the stretch 40%-50% that the pattern is recommended for. Yesterday’s sew-along post i briefly touched on the topic of sewing with good quality knit fabrics for Bonnie or any other knit pattern you plan on sewing up so keep this mind too when out fabric shopping.

Some of the fabric i used i  sourced locally at some of  the below places:

 
These all have a great selection of knit fabrics.

If you’re already a knit fabric hoarder then you probably already have your favorite places to buy awesome knit fabric, if you do and would like to share them feel free to leave a comment below so we build a resource list together… 
That’s if you want to share your gems ๐Ÿ™‚


Supplies & Tools you’ll need

Back to yesterday’s post again, i listed a few of the tools and supplies you need to have to sew up knit fabrics, these also apply to sewing up the Bonnie pattern.

* Main fabric

* Matching Thread*2 1/2 yards of 1/4” (6mm) clear plastic tape
* Ball point needles
*Optional: Twin needle for hemming
*Optional: Ribbing fabric for neckband & waistband
* Pins
* Pattern weights
*Rotary cutter and Self healing mat ( optional)
* Tracing paper & Pencil
* Sharpie/Marker

And obviously your copy of the Bonnie pattern ( Paper or PDF) ready to go. 
You can pick up a copy here.

CHOOSE YOUR SIZE  
Choosing you size for Bonnie is just the same as if you would pick your size for a woven pattern. Simply measure your Bust, waist and hips.


Bust measurement: Measure around the fullest point of your bust, wearing whatever type of bra or undergarment you plan on wearing under your Bonnie sweater. 
Waist measurement: Is at your natural waist. On many people this is the smallest point of your torso.

 Hip measurement: The fullest part of your hips and butt. Typically this is approximately 7″ below your natural waist, but this differs on everyone. This measurement isn’t too important on the Odette dress due to the skirt being flared and skimming over the hips and butt, make measure it anyway just to be on the safe side.
You may need a hand and  have someone help you take your measurements, especially the bust,  as having your arms up and holding the tape can affect the measurement slightly.
 I ran through choosing your sizing, dealing with being in between sizes, tracing your pattern and whole heap of other tips in the previous Odette sew-along i ran here on the blog. To save this post being super long and wordy you can check out this post and read up on all this info in more detail, if you need to. Read up on prepping and cutting out your fabric here as well if you need to.
If you need some inspiration for your Bonnie then check out the Pinterest Board I’ve set up with some lovely stuff in it.  Feel free to add your own Bonnie inspiration too.


Abby
x


Gather up all your fabric, tools and supplies, choose your size, trace your pattern, prep and  cut out your fabric cause we will be start to sew up our Bonnie’s tomorrow!
read more

Bacon Bimaa

Two words for you: bacon Bimaa My middle son has long held an affinity for food-themed clothing.  When he was four he asked for “underwear with food on it” for Christmas.  His favorite, most-worn shirts have always been those with food puns.  Especially breakfast foods.  The boy loves clothes and he loves food.  Then I found Beloved Shirts; super realistic graphic prints, many of

read more

Happy Thanksgiving!

This is a syndicated post. Please visit the original author at The Mahogany Stylist

read more