Power Hummus

May 18, 2017   /   byEmma Chapman  / Categories :  Feeds

First off, let me describe in more detail what flavors are present in this hummus as the name doesn’t really tell you much (so mysterious). We’ve got a good amount of garlic, some cilantro, and plenty of lime juice among other obvious-hummus-ingredients (like chickpeas and olive oil). I love these flavors as they kind of remind me of guacamole. And if you don’t like guacamole, I don’t even know where to start.

But what is the power? Well, this hummus also contains a solid 1/2 cup of pumpkin seeds—which are protein packed (and also delicious). So you can just imagine this hummus as a guy at the gym saying, “Do you even lift, bro?” if you want. 🙂

All kidding aside, this hummus tastes creamy with a nice pop of flavor from the lime and garlic, plus it’s a great filling snack with the added protein. #plantpowered (Can we make this a thing???)

Power Hummus, makes around 2 cups of hummus

1 can chickpeas, drained
1/2 cup pumpkin seeds
5 cloves of garlic
2 heaping tablespoons chopped cilantro
juice from 2 limes
1 teaspoon salt
1/3 cup extra virgin olive oil

In a blender or food processor, pulse the pumpkin seeds until well blended.

Add the chickpeas, garlic, cilantro, lime juice, and salt and blend well. Then add the olive oil in a slow steady stream while the processor is running. If your processor doesn’t allow you to add ingredients as it blends, you can simply add it in batches, blending in between additions.

Taste and add more salt if you like. You can also squeeze a little more lime juice over everything just before serving. Or if you find you just ran out of limes, then a little lemon juice. Go figure that a citrus freak like me would run out of limes. 😉

Enjoy your creamy, dreamy protein-packed hummus with veggies, chips, or spread over bread for a sandwich. Do your thing.

Notes: Save the juice from your canned chickpeas and make something! It’s called Aquafaba, and I’m just starting to get into it. I can’t wait to make Minimalist Baker’s vegan mayo. Looks SO good!

-I like to remove the skins of the chickpeas before making hummus as it tends to make the hummus smoother. It’s not necessary, just an option worth nothing.

Enjoy! xo. Emma

Credits // Author and Photography: Emma Chapman. Photos edited the with NEW A Beautiful Mess actions.

This is a syndicated post. Please visit the original author at A Beautiful Mess

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