What I Made: Tabitha

June 4, 2017   /   byMaddie Flanigan  / Categories :  Feeds

What have I been crushing on? Color, color, color. Just scope out my lingerie kits – I think that’s evident. Last year, I was all about minimalism, and for the most part, my wardrobe consisted of black, white and jeans. It was kind of a Calvin Klein, 90s vibe. I hung onto that for the early part of this year, but when old man winter left, I experienced an about face. While my wardrobe, including lingerie, still follows that minimalist approach, I want to make bold statements with pink, yellows, blues and oranges. Maybe it’s the summer vibes kickin’ in, or maybe I’ve been drinking too much Kool-Aid? Who knows, but expect to see more playful pops for a while.

diy off the shoulder top

Fabric:
Bodysuit: Body and neckline flare are a multi-color stripe Sport Lycra from Spoonflower. Print was custom designed by C.Banning, a long time sponsor of Madalynne. You can visit her SF shop here to purchase the exact fabric or her other designs. All of them are pretty cool, if you ask me.

The quality of SF’s Lycra is worth the price. The colors are super vibrant and the fabric is extremely soft. What’s great about Lycra is that it can be used to make regular clothing as well as lingerie, active wear or swimwear. I highly recommend trying it out, and if you DO(!), use the code Maddie10 to receive 10% off 1+ yards of Sport Lycra (valid until August 31).

cotton jersey for crotch lining from my stash

Skirt: Pre-pleated polyester something from Jomar. If you’re not familiar with Jomar, it’s a discount store in Philadelphia where you can find some real gems. The first floor is like Ross or Marshalls and the second is fabric and trims. An unlikely combo. It’s a little sketch, but can be a gold mine. Definitely check it out if you’re in the area.

Trims:
The neckline and leg openings are finished with 3/8″ picot plush elastic.

Pattern:
This pattern is the same one used for Maeve, a RTW bodysuit I’ll be releasing for sale this July (as of right now, the pattern is not available for sale/download). The only pattern change I made was to increase flare on the neckline piece. That was an easy alteration using the slash and open method, which I demonstrated way long ago in this post.

Construction:
Construction was super simple. Here’s how it came together:
Bodysuit:
1. Sewed front and back body and neckline pieces together at the side seams using a 3 thread overlock.
2. Finish the armholes (raglan) with a 3 thread overlock. Turned back and topstitched with zig zag stitch.
3. Sewed front and back together at crotch, clean finishing crotch lining in the seam.
4. Finished the leg opening with 3/8″ picot plush elastic.
4. Basted the neckline piece to the front and back using a zigzag stitch. Note: since Lycra doesn’t fray, I didn’t finish the bottom of the flare. I left it raw. 
5. Finished the body and the neckline piece together with 3/8″ elastic – applied the same way as the leg opening. In order for the neckline to stay put during wearing, I had to undercut the elastic about 30%. The circumference of my upper chest area was 36″, so I cut the elastic 26″ and this accounted for 1/2″ overlap to make a circle. On my practice garment, I only undercut 15% – it wasn’t enough at all. Thirty percent provided enough tension so that it would fall down, but also wasn’t too much so that it cut off my circulation.

Skirt:
1. Sewed front and back together at the side seams.
2. Attached the skirt to the waistband, which was a rectangle.
3. Applied invisible zipper at center back.
4. Hemmed with a 3 thread overlock (no turnback).

All sewing was done on a PFAFF Passport 2.0, a great sewing machine for experienced and new sewists. Check out my full review here

diy lingerie diy lingerie bra making

Comments:
In addition to being all about color, I’ve also been digging multi-colored stripes and playing around with their direction. I’ve made about 4 iterations of this design. For the one I wore to my last workshop, the stripes on the body are horizontal and the stripes on the neckline piece are vertical at the arms, but angled at the center front / back. I wasn’t sure if I liked it, so I made another, pictured on the right below. For this one, the stripes for both the body and the neckline piece are vertical at the center front and back (due to the flare, it is angles at the side seam of the neckline piece). Which one do I like more? Depends on the day! I’ve been wearing both versions as normal clothing with jeans and skirts as well as swimwear. Because I didn’t use swimwear elastic, I’ve been staying out of the water/pool.

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