Latch Hook Wall Hanging DIY

August 14, 2017   /   byRachel Denbow  / Categories :  Feeds

If you’re not really interested in learning to weave but love the textured wall hangings you’re seeing all over the Internet, I’ve got the perfect weave-hack project for you. You can use this latch hook rug canvas and hook to get the same shaggy wall hanging style. It won’t necessarily be any faster but it won’t require some of the tools and skills you’d need if you were wanting to weave the same thing. Plus you can customize the size of your wall hanging very quickly.

It’s a great way to destash your yarn pile if you’re a knitter or crocheter and you can use this tutorial to skip the wall hanging and just make your own rug! I love how my shaggy wall hanging turned out and all of the fluffy texture it adds to my studio space. Get the details for making your own below.

Supplies:
-24″ x 30″ latch hook canvas
latch hook
-seven or eight skeins of yarn in various colors. I used a variety of thicknesses and also used both wool and cotton.
-scissors
-dowel or stick as wide as the canvas

You can sketch out your design first or just freehand it. You can even trace your color block shapes with a marker onto the canvas to make it easier! Once you’re comfortable with your design, start cutting your yarn into strands. The strands on the bottom of your canvas should be the longest and then you can cut them to a more consistent length. The lengths on the bottom of mine varied from 14″-24″ long and I used scrap cardboard that measured 7″ and 12″, respectively, as my base and just wound my yarn around them over and over before making a cut at one end. Keep cutting your strands as you go. The rest of my strands were about 5″ long and then I trimmed them once I was finished adding them all to my canvas.

Step One: Cut your latch hook canvas to your preferred size. I cut mine to measure about 14″ x 28″. The bigger your size, the more yarn you’ll need. Then place two strands of yarn under your hook.

Step Two: Hold all four strand ends in one hand so that they are just about at the crook of your latch hook. Then slide the hook under one of the single strands on your canvas so that it comes up again. Make sure you slide it through past the latch.

Step Three: Wrap your four strands to one side of the latch.

Step Four: Gently pull the handle toward your body to close the latch with the yarn inside the hook.

Step Five: Keep gently pulling toward you so that your ends continue to pull through.

Step Six: This is how it should look when you are finished. One down, one million to go! Just kidding. But not really.

I usually work on a fiber project from the bottom up, but I knew I wanted to use a lot of whites on this one. I added three spots of color as my focal points and then filled things in from there. I just wound my yarn and cut strands as I went instead of counting them out beforehand. No one needs that kind of pressure.

Work on one color block at a time or mix it up and fill it in from one side to the other. Adding in different shades of the same color can help blend your design, but contrasting colors work well together, too.

This project will likely take you more than a few hours to complete if you fill a space as big as this one, but you could easily cut your canvas down to a 6″ x 10″ size and make a smaller version of this.

Once you’ve worked your way to within 2″ of the top, call it a day. You’ll need that space to fold a hem pocket.

Flip your wall hanging to the other side and fold in your sides about 1/2″. Then use some of your yarn to stitch this down with a running stitch and tie a knot at the beginning and end. This will add a nice edge and make sure your strands cover it up nicely.

Then fold the top of your canvas down so that there isn’t any bare space showing from the front. Use more yarn to stitch it to the main canvas with a running stitch and secure on both ends with a knot. Then add your copper pipe or dowel by slipping it through the space you just created and then add a hanger by slipping it through your copper pipe or tying knots on each end of your dowel.

The final step is hanging it up and brushing things out with your fingertips. Then feel free to trim up rogue ends or whole sections to get the shape you want.

If you love this look and have been wanting to explore weaving, my book DIY Woven Art is a great resource for beginners and even intermediates! You can find it here. – Rachel

Credits//Author: Rachel Denbow. Photography: Rachel Denbow and Elise Abigail.

This is a syndicated post. Please visit the original author at A Beautiful Mess

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