Introducing the new Banksia blouse sewing pattern!

My friends I am thrilled to announce that I am re-releasing my much loved and out-of-print-for-a-very-long-time Banksia blouse sewing pattern! This pattern as originally released was one of my very first and as such was drafted using a different fit model and block than I currently use. As much as i love the original pattern I think […]

The post Introducing the new Banksia blouse sewing pattern! appeared first on megan nielsen design diary.

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Elementary Wrap

Sometimes you just want to knit. You want to take your eyes off your project,…

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Random Threads # 29 thoughts about basting among other subjects

My notebook list of topics and things that I want to either mention, praise, or rant about is filling a whole page which means it’s time for another Random Threads post.

By the way if you are new to this blog, the previous edition of Random Threads is here. If you haven’t read that it’s entertaining to read the comments and see that the issue of evolving sewing terminology is something that everyone has an opinion about.

Basting – Do you do it? With every year and every garment sewn I am more and more convinced about the benefits of basting a garment together. At my last knit t-shirt class I had a number of people who were just past beginners, and not at all familiar with sewing knits. I asked them to baste at a couple of points in the construction, to attach the neckband, and then when putting on the sleeves. They thought it seemed like extra work but I said try it. Why baste the neckband? Who hasn’t had one of those little blips where you are happily sewing along and all seems well, then you turn it over and see this?

knit band mistake

Or perhaps putting in the sleeve and not having any success with distributing the sleeve cap ease. Or trying to make a skirt more fitted and stitch it up with tight little stitches and then put it on and realize you need another inch?  Basting takes just a few minutes. It actually goes quite quickly since the stitch length is longer. Then a quick examination or a try-on to check fit and it all is OK you can sew the whole seam with NO pins – which is also quicker and easier. Without exception I pin sleeves in a garment, then machine baste, sewing over the pins (yep I do that most all the time) and then after removing all the pins I can carefully examine the sleeve, see how the cap looks, make sure I didn’t make the seam allowance too wide which is kind of easy to do on a tight curve. Then all the little fixes can be taken care of by snipping out the basting stitches in the section that needs attention. I even usually do the basting in a contrast color, so I can really see it on the fabric, and then sew the real stitching just a fraction to the side, so that there is no need to remove the basting. Anyway by the end of the class I had convinced a few about basting and their final neckbands looked great.

Here’s an example of basting, on a side seam, I baste, try on, straighten out the transition from one seam to another, and then when it fits as I want  – then I sew it up with a regular stitch length.

Basting side seam

The Walking Foot: What’s up with the devotion to a walking foot? I have never used it! This subject is definitely a “to each her own – whatever works for you” type of topic. Every week I see mention of this with people saving up their sewing $$ to buy the Bernina walking foot which must include the precious sewing magic dust to sprinkle over each project for sewing success.  OK – I’m being a little sarcastic but I wonder what I’m missing. Or conversely that I have never needed it for any garment sewing that I’ve done. I think my philosophy toward sewing is similar to the way I also feel about cooking. It’s less about tools and more about having the basics that you use to make any and everything. Perhaps it’s also how you learned, if you didn’t have a certain tool then you learned to do it the  – dare I say – old-fashioned way and it still works. That may be why I don’t use the serger all that much. It is handy for finishing ravel-y fabrics like denim but other than that I don’t like to use it.

Patterns that are the same: Recently I saw a new indie pattern release and it looked exactly the same as a New Look knit top I made a couple of years ago (which is still available). This week I saw the new Colette dress pattern, one that has so many virtually identical cousins available in other pattern companies, from Burda to Vogue to plenty of other indies. Do you have loyalty to a specific pattern company and then wait for them to release a specific type of garment? Is it the pictures of the samples that sells you on a specific pattern? I mostly look at the line drawings to decide on patterns, and am always looking for interesting or new details. Having said this before, I am kind of over PDF patterns. The printing/taping part is just so annoying to me.

Refashioners: the things that people make by refashioning something is just fantastic. This year it appears the challenge was to refashion a men’s tailored suit into something different and wearable. What a great place to start. Last year it was denim jeans and I thought that was great as well. What could be next year’s starting point?

KonMari method: Why do I have a possibly irrational antipathy to this method of organization? Fully admitting that I probably have junk I could get rid of, but I’m not much of a shopper or hoarder. Somehow the pared down minimalistic vibe bugs me. This type of life management is marketed as a brand just like a lot of others and is still selling something, be it a books or seminars if not actual products. I give her credit for not starting to sell physical products like closet organizers etc. but the warning that you shouldn’t keep things only because they might be useful someday disregards the fact that a thing you are not using today will actually be useful. Here’s an example: I have 5 pyrex glass pie pans, which are my preferred type. I love to make pie, do it often in the summer, Thanksgiving etc but I don’t make a pie every week, or every month for that matter. But when I want to make them I can, and if I bring a pie to a friend’s house I can leave the leftovers and get the dish back whenever. Same thought goes for tools – lots of different pliers and screwdrivers, paint rollers, garden implements. All that stuff which you have to store but would be silly not to keep. The same analogy goes for clothing, I have things I rarely wear but they are needed then they are there. Plus it seems wasteful to get rid of things just for the sake of decluttering. As I have mentioned before I come from a long line of string savers (my term) people who kept small glass jars of various screws, nails and other useful bits so that when you needed something it was there. And why I keep a lot of my interfacing scraps in a plastic bag so when I need a small piece I feel like I’m utilizing something that would have been wasted. True confession though, my sock drawer storage method is to chuck the clean socks fresh from the laundry in the drawer and then fish around for a matching pair when needed. works for me:)

Sewing sleeves flat: I generally sew all sleeves in the round. Meaning that the side seam and sleeve seam are sewn up, and then the circle of the sleeve is joined to the circle of the armhole on the garment. Recently I saw a post with someone sewing a woven sleeve into a woven fabric garment in the flat way. I object! Have you done this? Do you think it works out OK? and then what about the dominant seam? i.e. the long seam continuing from sleeve down the side. It seems a less elegant finish to a garment and I don’t even do it on knits. Hey, I am slapdash with my sock drawer but not with my seams!

Are the 80’s back? Oh I hope not! Whenever I go to a garage sale or some other spot where you can browse though boxes of older patterns selling for pennies, there are so many hideous 80’s patterns! I can’t get past the shoulder pads and the shapelessness. Certainly every era including the 80’s had interesting clothes but you would not guess that from looking at the sewing patterns from that era. However the 60’s patterns I come across are often super cute and wearable. And the older ones 40’s and 50’s have such interesting details. Let’s skip the 80’s revival, please!

Check out this website:  TheThackery    Craftsy asked me to write a post on sewing with cork fabric. And I said Ok, but what is it? ha ha, did some googling and pinteresting (a word I just made up) and the cork fabric looked interesting.  I ordered some cork fabric from an eBay seller and in the package was a business card for The Thackery. So I looked at the site and they sell the cork fabric and a bunch of other cool stuff, art supplies, magnets, very classy looking Italian sewing shears. Here’s a look at sewing the cork fabric, it sews like a dream, really easy to work with and it just might convince me to make a handbag, or something like that. The natural cork with tiny metallic splatters on it is so pretty – would make a great clutch bag for summer.

sewing cork

Once again I am slightly concerned that I sound super cranky in this post – but based on the fact that these Random Threads get more comments than any of my other posts we all need to vent a little bit! And I didn’t even get to these topics:  Stretch thread…necessary? worthwhile? marketing gimmick? How about new pattern releases – I’m starting to think that I am completed jaded with new pattern releases, even from my usual favorites Vogue and Burda. (Once again I turn to the thesaurus and see all the alternatives for that word “jaded”, meaning weary, glutted, inured, unmoved, blasé. ) Yes all those things exactly!  Or perhaps it’s that it is fall/winter and come spring I will find all kinds of new patterns to tempt me. Very likely!

Up next, a new shirt using fabric I bought at Mood last October, a knit dress using fabric I bought at Stone Mountain last month, and after that who knows.

This Saturday is the start of our Button Front Shirt class at Hello Stitch Studio in Berkeley which is sold out (although we will be scheduling this one regularly as it fills up) In the afternoon is the Knit Dress class which I think has one or two spots left. In December I’m doing a Copy an Existing Garment class which should be fun (also filling up). Actually they are all fun – I am meeting some amazing and interesting people and enjoying every class. People who sew are the best! Maybe I am biased. Ha ha, biased, sad little sewing pun there.  Check the website and see what might interest you, Jacket/Coat class also scheduled again in December.

Happy Sewing, and try a little basting too!

Beth

Today’s garden photo, I got this mallow plant which seemed less than promising back in the spring at the local junior college’s plant sale. It was a spindly thing but now it is about 5 feet tall, and covered with the prettiest pink flowers. A winner, I will definitely get another one to fill in some other bare spots.

IMG_3130

read more

Random Threads # 29 thoughts about basting among other subjects

My notebook list of topics and things that I want to either mention, praise, or rant about is filling a whole page which means it’s time for another Random Threads post.

By the way if you are new to this blog, the previous edition of Random Threads is here. If you haven’t read that it’s entertaining to read the comments and see that the issue of evolving sewing terminology is something that everyone has an opinion about.

Basting – Do you do it? With every year and every garment sewn I am more and more convinced about the benefits of basting a garment together. At my last knit t-shirt class I had a number of people who were just past beginners, and not at all familiar with sewing knits. I asked them to baste at a couple of points in the construction, to attach the neckband, and then when putting on the sleeves. They thought it seemed like extra work but I said try it. Why baste the neckband? Who hasn’t had one of those little blips where you are happily sewing along and all seems well, then you turn it over and see this?

knit band mistake

Or perhaps putting in the sleeve and not having any success with distributing the sleeve cap ease. Or trying to make a skirt more fitted and stitch it up with tight little stitches and then put it on and realize you need another inch?  Basting takes just a few minutes. It actually goes quite quickly since the stitch length is longer. Then a quick examination or a try-on to check fit and it all is OK you can sew the whole seam with NO pins – which is also quicker and easier. Without exception I pin sleeves in a garment, then machine baste, sewing over the pins (yep I do that most all the time) and then after removing all the pins I can carefully examine the sleeve, see how the cap looks, make sure I didn’t make the seam allowance too wide which is kind of easy to do on a tight curve. Then all the little fixes can be taken care of by snipping out the basting stitches in the section that needs attention. I even usually do the basting in a contrast color, so I can really see it on the fabric, and then sew the real stitching just a fraction to the side, so that there is no need to remove the basting. Anyway by the end of the class I had convinced a few about basting and their final neckbands looked great.

Here’s an example of basting, on a side seam, I baste, try on, straighten out the transition from one seam to another, and then when it fits as I want  – then I sew it up with a regular stitch length.

Basting side seam

The Walking Foot: What’s up with the devotion to a walking foot? I have never used it! This subject is definitely a “to each her own – whatever works for you” type of topic. Every week I see mention of this with people saving up their sewing $$ to buy the Bernina walking foot which must include the precious sewing magic dust to sprinkle over each project for sewing success.  OK – I’m being a little sarcastic but I wonder what I’m missing. Or conversely that I have never needed it for any garment sewing that I’ve done. I think my philosophy toward sewing is similar to the way I also feel about cooking. It’s less about tools and more about having the basics that you use to make any and everything. Perhaps it’s also how you learned, if you didn’t have a certain tool then you learned to do it the  – dare I say – old-fashioned way and it still works. That may be why I don’t use the serger all that much. It is handy for finishing ravel-y fabrics like denim but other than that I don’t like to use it.

Patterns that are the same: Recently I saw a new indie pattern release and it looked exactly the same as a New Look knit top I made a couple of years ago (which is still available). This week I saw the new Colette dress pattern, one that has so many virtually identical cousins available in other pattern companies, from Burda to Vogue to plenty of other indies. Do you have loyalty to a specific pattern company and then wait for them to release a specific type of garment? Is it the pictures of the samples that sells you on a specific pattern? I mostly look at the line drawings to decide on patterns, and am always looking for interesting or new details. Having said this before, I am kind of over PDF patterns. The printing/taping part is just so annoying to me.

Refashioners: the things that people make by refashioning something is just fantastic. This year it appears the challenge was to refashion a men’s tailored suit into something different and wearable. What a great place to start. Last year it was denim jeans and I thought that was great as well. What could be next year’s starting point?

KonMari method: Why do I have a possibly irrational antipathy to this method of organization? Fully admitting that I probably have junk I could get rid of, but I’m not much of a shopper or hoarder. Somehow the pared down minimalistic vibe bugs me. This type of life management is marketed as a brand just like a lot of others and is still selling something, be it a books or seminars if not actual products. I give her credit for not starting to sell physical products like closet organizers etc. but the warning that you shouldn’t keep things only because they might be useful someday disregards the fact that a thing you are not using today will actually be useful. Here’s an example: I have 5 pyrex glass pie pans, which are my preferred type. I love to make pie, do it often in the summer, Thanksgiving etc but I don’t make a pie every week, or every month for that matter. But when I want to make them I can, and if I bring a pie to a friend’s house I can leave the leftovers and get the dish back whenever. Same thought goes for tools – lots of different pliers and screwdrivers, paint rollers, garden implements. All that stuff which you have to store but would be silly not to keep. The same analogy goes for clothing, I have things I rarely wear but they are needed then they are there. Plus it seems wasteful to get rid of things just for the sake of decluttering. As I have mentioned before I come from a long line of string savers (my term) people who kept small glass jars of various screws, nails and other useful bits so that when you needed something it was there. And why I keep a lot of my interfacing scraps in a plastic bag so when I need a small piece I feel like I’m utilizing something that would have been wasted. True confession though, my sock drawer storage method is to chuck the clean socks fresh from the laundry in the drawer and then fish around for a matching pair when needed. works for me:)

Sewing sleeves flat: I generally sew all sleeves in the round. Meaning that the side seam and sleeve seam are sewn up, and then the circle of the sleeve is joined to the circle of the armhole on the garment. Recently I saw a post with someone sewing a woven sleeve into a woven fabric garment in the flat way. I object! Have you done this? Do you think it works out OK? and then what about the dominant seam? i.e. the long seam continuing from sleeve down the side. It seems a less elegant finish to a garment and I don’t even do it on knits. Hey, I am slapdash with my sock drawer but not with my seams!

Are the 80’s back? Oh I hope not! Whenever I go to a garage sale or some other spot where you can browse though boxes of older patterns selling for pennies, there are so many hideous 80’s patterns! I can’t get past the shoulder pads and the shapelessness. Certainly every era including the 80’s had interesting clothes but you would not guess that from looking at the sewing patterns from that era. However the 60’s patterns I come across are often super cute and wearable. And the older ones 40’s and 50’s have such interesting details. Let’s skip the 80’s revival, please!

Check out this website:  TheThackery    Craftsy asked me to write a post on sewing with cork fabric. And I said Ok, but what is it? ha ha, did some googling and pinteresting (a word I just made up) and the cork fabric looked interesting.  I ordered some cork fabric from an eBay seller and in the package was a business card for The Thackery. So I looked at the site and they sell the cork fabric and a bunch of other cool stuff, art supplies, magnets, very classy looking Italian sewing shears. Here’s a look at sewing the cork fabric, it sews like a dream, really easy to work with and it just might convince me to make a handbag, or something like that. The natural cork with tiny metallic splatters on it is so pretty – would make a great clutch bag for summer.

sewing cork

Once again I am slightly concerned that I sound super cranky in this post – but based on the fact that these Random Threads get more comments than any of my other posts we all need to vent a little bit! And I didn’t even get to these topics:  Stretch thread…necessary? worthwhile? marketing gimmick? How about new pattern releases – I’m starting to think that I am completed jaded with new pattern releases, even from my usual favorites Vogue and Burda. (Once again I turn to the thesaurus and see all the alternatives for that word “jaded”, meaning weary, glutted, inured, unmoved, blasé. ) Yes all those things exactly!  Or perhaps it’s that it is fall/winter and come spring I will find all kinds of new patterns to tempt me. Very likely!

Up next, a new shirt using fabric I bought at Mood last October, a knit dress using fabric I bought at Stone Mountain last month, and after that who knows.

This Saturday is the start of our Button Front Shirt class at Hello Stitch Studio in Berkeley which is sold out (although we will be scheduling this one regularly as it fills up) In the afternoon is the Knit Dress class which I think has one or two spots left. In December I’m doing a Copy an Existing Garment class which should be fun (also filling up). Actually they are all fun – I am meeting some amazing and interesting people and enjoying every class. People who sew are the best! Maybe I am biased. Ha ha, biased, sad little sewing pun there.  Check the website and see what might interest you, Jacket/Coat class also scheduled again in December.

Happy Sewing, and try a little basting too!

Beth

Today’s garden photo, I got this mallow plant which seemed less than promising back in the spring at the local junior college’s plant sale. It was a spindly thing but now it is about 5 feet tall, and covered with the prettiest pink flowers. A winner, I will definitely get another one to fill in some other bare spots.

IMG_3130

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Our Weekly Newsletter

Hummingbird Pinafore from Cotton Stars Children’s Co Have you all been leaf peeping yet? We’re expecting a busy weekend upstate with lots of city dwellers coming up to enjoy the fall foliage in all its splendor. This little one is doing it right, camera in hand and wearing her very…

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Trick or Treat: 3 Lingerie Inspired Halloween Looks

We’re halfway into October. It’s Halloween month and we’re all in. The decor is out, the pumpkins are carved and our wardrobes are inching toward being totally #PSL-hued. Consider us bewitched. Running out of time? Can’t think of an outfit for Hallow’s Eve? Or maybe you don’t want to spend a fortune on something you’ll only…

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The post Trick or Treat: 3 Lingerie Inspired Halloween Looks appeared first on Madalynne.

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Redeemed

This all started about a year ago.  Things were calming down in my life after a long spell of crisis.   My daily schedule was starting to look like a normal mom’s and I was getting a decent amount of sleep each night.  We had also succes…

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A Dear Prudence Dress

Two years ago I made Tia a Dear Prudence dress, pattern by Suz from Sewpony Vintage. Each of my children has their own unique style and each has specific favorites of the garments I make.  For Tia, her Dear Prudence dress is one she has worn again…

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A Dear Prudence Dress

Two years ago I made Tia a Dear Prudence dress, pattern by Suz from Sewpony Vintage. Each of my children has their own unique style and each has specific favorites of the garments I make.  For Tia, her Dear Prudence dress is one she has worn again…

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Pink + Orange Fall Tablescape

Each year when fall (and then the holidays) roll around, I feel inspired to play with different color…

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You’re Invited to a Moonlit Garden Party

Please Enjoy our Sewing Inspiration VIDEO for Moonlit! Designed and printed right here at Hawthorne Threads, Moonlit is a wistful collection of nature inspired designs, resplendent in a moody palette of aspen, carnation pink, jungle green, pebble gray and twilight blue. Enjoy a wistful walk through a Moonlit garden, luminous…

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A Kalle Shirtdress pattern in Blue Tencel

Kalle Shirtdress in blue tencel // sewing pattern by Closet Case PatternsI just realized this week I totally failed to post about this Kalle shirtdress I made in the spring. I’ve

You’re reading A Kalle Shirtdress pattern in Blue Tencel by Closet Case Patterns. If you’ve enjoyed this post you can also follow us on Instagram , Twitter and Facebook.

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A Kalle Shirtdress pattern in Blue Tencel

Kalle Shirtdress in blue tencel // sewing pattern by Closet Case PatternsI just realized this week I totally failed to post about this Kalle shirtdress I made in the spring. I’ve

You’re reading A Kalle Shirtdress pattern in Blue Tencel by Closet Case Patterns. If you’ve enjoyed this post you can also follow us on Instagram , Twitter and Facebook.

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Randomly on a Thursday

1. Two days ago Joe and I got on a plane and flew to New York City for a little bite of the Big Apple 2. He had work and me too, but we still had the time to make … Continue reading

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Just Add Water

Water is water, isn’t it? Not when it comes to ironing – or should I say pressing. Do you know the difference? Ironing is when you use pressure and friction; when your iron glides across fabric. Pressing is when you … Continue reading

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Rushbrook Dress and Top – Blog Tour Day 6

For the final day of the Rushbrook Tour I have three First is Angeline from Spools + Oodles of…

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Pants class – skinny jeans

jeans: self-drafted // sweater: hand-knitted These are the jeans I drafted for my pants drafting class! I’m so so thrilled with these jeans. The only jeans pattern I’d tried before were the Jamie jeans by Named, which I adored, but only after I made tons of changes to the fit, by which point the legs […]

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Tutorial: How to make an improv Dresden block, in any size (PART 2)

Now you have your template, let’s get ready to use it! Of course you can just use it to cut out unpieced fabric, and sew them together, turn under the top edge 1/4″ and applique to a background, but I’m going to show you how I made a few different blades too. Some of them […]

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Tutorial: How to make an improv Dresden block, in any size (PART 2)

Now you have your template, let’s get ready to use it! Of course you can just use it to cut out unpieced fabric, and sew them together, turn under the top edge 1/4″ and applique to a background, but I’m going to show you how I made a few different blades too. Some of them […]

read more

Pattern Review: Closet Case Patterns Sophie Swimsuit Bikini Top

Since Sophie was released, there’s been a million and one amazing makes of this swimsuit. The consensus: it is well drafted, stylish, and achievable. But I can’t be the only one thinking looks great, but will it fit my mega-boobs? Let’s be real, that’s what I’m thinking about every swimsuit pattern ever, while giving it…

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How to Stitch a Fireplace

Sometimes your fire is inside a fireplace. With stitches you can easily create your fireplace and mantle, no matter what the style might be. Today we’ll talk about the elements in your fireplace and the stitches you can use. Bricks Many fireplaces are made from bricks, but bricks are not all the same. Bricks are […]

The post How to Stitch a Fireplace appeared first on Nuts about Needlepoint.

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Make a Sewing Caddy

Finding a fun little project that will also enhance your life is just the best! I made up my little sewing caddy and was immediately so happy that I did. Such a wonderful place to store everything you may need while sitting at the machine. My husband e…

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DIY Spider Web Chocolate Bars 

Sure, Halloween has pumpkins, costumes, and creepy decorations, but we all know what the real star of the…

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My second book contribution + give-away

Today, I’m talking about a brand new sewing book, called Crafty Little Things to Sew and put together by the amazing Caroline Critchfield (from SewCanShe). It is the sewing second book I’m contributing to, and I’m so happy to finally have in my hands. The book features 20 projects which can be made from small […]

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Fall Road Trips, Hot Air Balloons & Quilts

Fall is one of the most beautiful times of year to spend some time taking a scenic drive or a mini road trip. The leaves are turning stunning shades of red, orange and gold and the weather is still nice … Continue reading

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In Memphis

 Let’s talk about the food in Memphis! In just 48 hours we: devoured BBQ, the Memphis way, at Central BBQ (tasting everything from a plate of 3 meats and some sides, but the biggest surprise was the banana pudding dessert) feasted on southern-style courses at Itta Bena above BB Kings Blues Club (I ordered the duck and […]

The post In Memphis appeared first on 9to5Chic.

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Aurora blouse and dress -Wardrobe by me pattern

This is a new favorite pattern, the Aurora blouse and dress from Wardrobe by me. I saw the tester call on Facebook and I was thinking that a pattern like this will be perfect for al the blouse fabrics I bought the last weeks so I applied and a…

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summer trip 2017 // 5

fig4.jpg

Today I’m going to show you some photos from Figeac, and from the house we rented.

fig2.jpgfig1.jpg

Figeac is a town in south-western France, with beautiful old buildings, and a museum (the Champollion Museum) that we visited, dedicated to Jean-François Champollion, known primarily as the decipherer of Egyptian hieroglyphs. We could walk (literally) on a large reproduction of the Rosetta Stone !

fig3.jpgrosetta.jpg

As for the house we rented, it was a beautiful old barn that had been renovated with lots of taste & love. The barn was built in 1872, so the renting place was called “le 18_72” ! This is a drawing of the place, seen from one side. The photo coming after was taken from the other side.

1872.jpg1872-2.jpg

It was slightly isolated, which was what we were looking for (for the peacefulness), and surrounded with fields or woods. Just perfect.

You can visit their website here if you want to see more photos !

fence.jpg

We saw lots & lots of birds, but my best photo captures are from this guy (that I haven’t identified). I slightly cropped the photos in order to have a little close-up on it.

bird1b.jpgbird2.jpg

I hope you’ve enjoyed these photos.

If you don’t have the time to comment, please would you like to hit the ♥ button, so that I know someone still reads my ol’ little journal. (besides me, that is). Thank you from the bottom of my heart !

ox

Sonia

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Cashmerette Springfield top again

When I first sewed the Cashmerette Springfield top I sewed it a size too big, but I thought that it was definitely worth taking the pattern out for another try.  A month or so ago I did exactly that, and sewed view B in size 12 C/D. The fabric is hand-woven Thai cotton, the leftovers… Continue reading Cashmerette Springfield top again

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Ottobre 04-2017 #24 – Sweatshirt Tunic

My twins love a good cozy tunic. I decided that this one would be perfect for them with the long length, the round pocket, and the long sleeves. I made this in a size 140. This fabric doesn’t have much stretch so I decided to size up.This is a JoAnn’s …

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