The Terrace on 14th St.

Hello, fellow web-wizards and friends. Currently writing to you underground, from my 45min morning commute to work. I moved to a quiet, little brick place in Astoria, NY, that my fiancé, Z, and I call The Terrace on 14th Street.  We want our wedding on this little terrace, so we’re spending our free days whimsifying the place––a fleet of rocket ships and a room with celestial magic.

I started this blog when I was 12 and I’m now 22 and I can honestly say that all the good things that have happened in my life have come from friends like you who believed in me enough to just keep reading.  A sincere thank you to those who have taken an interest in my journey.

The last time I wrote on this blog (March 🙈) I was sleeping two hours a night,  20lbs under weight, and losing hair in clumps.  Since graduating in June, I’m happy to say that I’m now 10lbs overweight, sleeping a balanced 7-9 hours a night, and my hair is growing back at a steady rate.  

I’m finally at a spot where I’m excited to share again––how I’ve grown, how I’m growing.  I’ll be posting again on the reg, starting with these illustrations from my senior collection.  


Also, Z’s a really amazing guy.  Can’t wait to share more about him ^_^ 
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The Terrace on 14th St.

Hello, fellow web-wizards and friends. Currently writing to you underground, from my 45min morning commute to work. I moved to a quiet, little brick place in Astoria, NY, that my fiancé, Z, and I call The Terrace on 14th Street.  We want our wedding on this little terrace, so we’re spending our free days whimsifying the place––a fleet of rocket ships and a room with celestial magic.

I started this blog when I was 12 and I’m now 22 and I can honestly say that all the good things that have happened in my life have come from friends like you who believed in me enough to just keep reading.  A sincere thank you to those who have taken an interest in my journey.

The last time I wrote on this blog (March 🙈) I was sleeping two hours a night,  20lbs under weight, and losing hair in clumps.  Since graduating in June, I’m happy to say that I’m now 10lbs overweight, sleeping a balanced 7-9 hours a night, and my hair is growing back at a steady rate.  

I’m finally at a spot where I’m excited to share again––how I’ve grown, how I’m growing.  I’ll be posting again on the reg, starting with these illustrations from my senior collection.  


Also, Z’s a really amazing guy.  Can’t wait to share more about him ^_^ 
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Spooky Hillbilly Chic

We’re almost all moved into our new house, meaning we almost have all of our stuff over at the house! But we are far from settled! We’ve been so busy I haven’t had time to blog about an outfit I wore a week and a half ago! Normally I like to blog within three days […]

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Rushbrook Dress and Top – Blog Tour Day 5

Today I have one very talented guest on the tour, Ana Sofia from S is for Sewing. I have admired…

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Short coat–Lekala 4625 back

It took me some time to find a pattern I wanted and could sew with the fabric I had. As this fabric was bought with the intention of sewing a Chanel style jacket I had only about two meters of fabric. Think it was a remnant piece as there were strange cut offs on both sides, probably for samples.
Having two meters to sew a coat is not much, to say the least. My choice of patterns was very limited and I settled for this Lekala pattern.
image
I will try to find an accent fabric for the belt/closing and if I can’t find it, I might skip that detail and sew buttonholes. I’m also thinking of adding pockets. A coat without pockets isn’t very good, don’t you think?
After roughly cutting the fabric pieces I block-fused them with a thin fusible interfacing. This I bought at the English couture company in the UK. (I used to buy most of my interfacing at Fashion Sewing supply from Pam Erny, but as they don’t ship internationally anymore I had to find another resource and this is certainly a good one. Great quality too).
The interfacing gives more stability to the fabric and keeps it from ravelling.
From that point I treat the fabric as the base fabric, meaning that I still added interfacing as I would for any jacket or coat that I did not block fuse with thin interfacing first.
PA180994
A back stay is added. The darts are pressed in the opposite direction from the darts of the main fabric. It could be better to stitch the seams with a catch stitch to keep them down. Something for another evening.
PA180996
A walking foot is almost a must to keep the lines matching.
PA180999

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15 Ways to Display Photos in Your Home

It’s an exciting day! Over on our Instagram account we are giving away a new Canon printer (it’s…

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Open Studio – The First for My Little Pottery Studio

Photo by Richard BoucherPhoto by Richard Boucher This past weekend, I joined with many other potters throughout the USA and world for National Clay Week. I had heard about this event which is in its second year on a podcast I listen to called Tale…

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unusual places to find sewing supplies: IKEA

Today we’re starting a new series. We’re going on some field trips to unusual places to find sewing supplies. We’re kicking it off with IKEA.

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Indiesew Fall/Winter Collection

If you’ve seen the new Indiesew Fall/Winter Collection you know that our Tamarack Jacket pattern was included in this year’s Full Collection! I’ve only had time to sew up one piece from the collection so far aside from our jacket since I’ve been out of town, the Matcha Top, but I definitely want to sneak […]

The post Indiesew Fall/Winter Collection appeared first on Grainline Studio.

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OLD HOLLYWOOD DIY DRESS USING VINTAGE VOGUE

HI DARLINGS! Happy Tuesday. Okay, I have had this dress sewn and hanging in my closet for what seems to be months. I had been dying to photograph it so this week I decided it was time. I am obsessed with this dress, it’s a VOGUE VINTAGE 2193 there are few on ETSY  and it is […]

The post OLD HOLLYWOOD DIY DRESS USING VINTAGE VOGUE appeared first on Mimi G Style.

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The Wednesday Showcase

It just occurred to me that I have an anniversary coming up…my very first ever blog post was written on October 20, 2009. Wow, 8 years ago! Eight…years…ago, it’s rather sweet to think back about that day. I’ve told the story before, but it was my…

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The Wednesday Showcase

It just occurred to me that I have an anniversary coming up…my very first ever blog post was written on October 20, 2009. Wow, 8 years ago! Eight…years…ago, it’s rather sweet to think back about that day. I’ve told the story before, but it was my…

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The Wednesday Showcase

It just occurred to me that I have an anniversary coming up…my very first ever blog post was written on October 20, 2009. Wow, 8 years ago! Eight…years…ago, it’s rather sweet to think back about that day. I’ve told the story before, but it was my…

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Tutorial: How to make an improv Dresden block, in any size (PART 1)

*** No vlog last weekend which was completely intentional, I felt like I needed a little break but there will be a video tutorial on piecing curves this week so keep on subscribing to my YouTube channel (and you could win a precut prize)! *** Hi everyone, today I thought I would bring you a […]

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Tutorial: How to make an improv Dresden block, in any size (PART 1)

*** No vlog last weekend which was completely intentional, I felt like I needed a little break but there will be a video tutorial on piecing curves this week so keep on subscribing to my YouTube channel (and you could win a precut prize)! *** Hi everyone, today I thought I would bring you a […]

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Turn Buttons into Needleminders Easily

You know the kind of button I mean. They have a wire, usually copper, bent to be the pin, below. Did you know that you can turn these buttons into magnetic needleminders in about a minute longer than it takes for the glue to dry? That’s what I did with this button from 3Kittens Needle […]

The post Turn Buttons into Needleminders Easily appeared first on Nuts about Needlepoint.

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Video: How to Make and Attach Piping to a Bag

Check out the method that I use for utilizing fusible interfacing to make and attach piping to a bag. It makes the process quick and easy, and your piping will look crisp and professional! Enjoy this free video! If you enjoyed this video, don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, where you can watch future videos […]

The post Video: How to Make and Attach Piping to a Bag appeared first on Sew Sweetness.

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Video: How to Use a Rivet Press

Rivet presses are confusing! What size dies do I get? Which rivets and grommets go with those dies? So many numbers and so many options. I’m levelling the playing field with this free video, showing you my rivet press, what dies I own, and how they work. I purchased my rivet press and dies from […]

The post Video: How to Use a Rivet Press appeared first on Sew Sweetness.

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Southwestern Tofu Scramble 

Saturday mornings mean one thing around my house—brunch! That usually meant going out for brunch but since having a baby…

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Inespiration

A few weeks ago Sara came up with the great idea of sewing something inspired by our wonderful friend…

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Quilts of Fall Festivals: Autumn Leaves

The falling leaves drift by my window, the autumn leaves of red and gold … Last week we had our first snow of the season here in the Denver area. It’s not at all uncommon for us to get some … Continue reading

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INESpiration

Today, we’re teaming up with a bunch of sewing bloggers to organize a warm celebration of our friend Ines from La Folie Sewing Booth. Under the title “Inespiration”, we have all created something inspired by Ines. I know Ines as a super kind, fun, and smart lady, and I have so much admiration for her […]

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Wrap

 Happy Wednesday! The last 48 hours have been a blur… if you want to see what I’ve been up to, please see my Instagram Stories before it’s gone! Besides an inspiring tour of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, we also got a chance to experience Memphis food (BBQ! Fried Chicken! Sweet Potato Pancakes!). And a […]

The post Wrap appeared first on 9to5Chic.

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How to Add In-Seam Pockets to a Garment

How to add in-seam pockets to a dress, skirt or trousers - Tilly and the Buttons

Hands up if you love clothes with pockets? Show me a DIY dressmaker who doesn’t!

What if the pattern you’re making doesn’t include pockets? No problemo – as well as topstitching patch pockets to the outside of a skirt, it’s easy to add in-seam (hidden) pockets to dresses, trousers, skirts and more. Today I’m going to show you how to do so – give this a whirl on the Bettine dress or Dominique skirt. Oh and you can download our pocket pattern piece for free!

Open the pattern in Adobe Reader (you can download it for free) and print the pattern piece actual size / 100% scale on A4 or Letter size paper.

Insert these pockets into your homemade garment before you start sewing the pieces together. Decide where you want the pockets to sit – hold up the front fabric piece to your body, imagine putting your hands in the pockets, and mark with pins where the top of the pocket openings will fall on the side seams. Mark the same position on the back fabric piece – let’s say it’s a skirt for the rest of this tutorial, but it could be a dress, the skirt part of a dress, trouser legs…

The sides of our pocket pattern are straight – if you’re making something that has a curved side seam, simply curve the side seam on the pocket pattern to fit your garment.

How to add in-seam pockets to a dress, skirt or trousers - Tilly and the Buttons

Cut four pocket pieces, or two symmetrical pairs. Cut four strips of iron-on interfacing 2cm (3/4in) wide by 19cm (7½in) long.

Lay the interfacing strips over the wrong side of the side seams on the front and back skirts, the top of the strip 10mm (3/8in) above the pin marking the top of the pocket opening. Remove the pins and press the interfacing strips in place with a hot, dry iron.

If you’re using woven fabric, finish the skirt side seams and the edges of the pocket pieces using zigzag stitch or an overlocker (serger).

How to add in-seam pockets to a dress, skirt or trousers - Tilly and the Buttons

Place a pocket piece over the front skirt, right sides together, so the pocket side seam lines up with the skirt side seam, and the curve of the pocket is pointing towards the skirt hem. Position the top of the pocket side seam 10mm (3/8in) below the top of the interfacing strip (which is on the wrong side of the fabric), and pin in place. Stitch with a 10mm (3/8in) seam allowance. Repeat on the other side seam of the front skirt, and then on the back skirt, ensuring the pockets on the back skirt line up with those on the front.

How to add in-seam pockets to a dress, skirt or trousers - Tilly and the Buttons

Fold the pockets away from the skirts and press. Place the front skirt over the back skirt, right sides together. Pin them together down the side seams and around the pocket curves, matching up the pockets and notches, and leaving the side seam where it joins the pockets unpinned. Mark pivot points on the wrong side of the skirt 15mm (5/8in) in from the raw edge of the side seams and pockets – marked in yellow on the pic above.

How to add in-seam pockets to a dress, skirt or trousers - Tilly and the Buttons

Using a 15mm (5/8in) seam allowance, stitch down one side seam until you reach the first pivot point. With the needle down, raise the presser foot and pivot the fabric until the pocket curve is pointing towards the needle, then lower the presser foot and continue sewing around the pocket curve. When you reach the second pivot point, pivot the fabric again and sew down the rest of the skirt side seam. Repeat on the other side seam.

How to add in-seam pockets to a dress, skirt or trousers - Tilly and the Buttons

Press the pockets and seam allowances towards the front skirt. And continue sewing your project!

How to add in-seam pockets to a dress, skirt or trousers - Tilly and the Buttons

And there you have it – easy-peasy pockets to stash your cash, keys and candy 🙂

PS. Like this post? You may also like How to make bias binding and How to line a dress.

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Granny Square Blanket in New Colors

Let’s give credit where credit is due and thank grannies for the endlessly fascinating square…

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Pura Med Spa

When Pura Med Spa asked me if I’d like to come try out their services, I couldn’t say yes fast enough. As a busy mom that is always taking care of someone else, I couldn’t be more excited for a morning of some much needed pampering and rest. I started the morning off with a […]

The post Pura Med Spa appeared first on Love Lola | A Life & Style Blog.

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Pura Med Spa

When Pura Med Spa asked me if I’d like to come try out their services, I couldn’t say yes fast enough. As a busy mom that is always taking care of someone else, I couldn’t be more excited for a morning of some much needed pampering and rest. I started the morning off with a […]

The post Pura Med Spa appeared first on Love Lola | A Life & Style Blog.

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Striped Bouclé Coat

Hey! It’s Shams of Communing with Fabric with another garment made from a beautiful Britex fabric! For this project, my assignment was to choose a fabric from the Wool category. I quickly settled on this beautiful bouclé, Coat-Weight Black & Winter White Wool Blend Bouclé (Made in Italy). It’s 80% wool and 20% polyester.

I absolutely love this fabric! If you know bouclé, you know that it’s more loosely woven than most wool fabrics, and it can ravel. And, yes, this fabric ravels, but that means that you can use it to make fabulous fringe! Its content is mostly wool, but I did not find it to be scratchy. If possible scratchiness concerns you, order a swatch.

I’ve been inspired by recent Chanel collections (and, of course, Chanel is famous for their use of bouclé). The 2018 Spring show was held recently in Paris. If you watch just the first few minutes, you’ll see wonderful bouclé dresses, tops, pants, and coats featuring long fringe:

This fabric is perfect for one of these garments! I wanted a long coat with fringe at the hem and sleeves. To preserve the drape-y nature of the bouclé, my coat is unlined. It also has no interfacing or underlining. I had no trouble sewing this fabric, but here are a few tips if you are new to bouclé:

  • Since bouclé ravels, avoid giving it that opportunity. Use patch or inseam pockets, rather than welt.
  • Choose a pattern with fewer seams.
  • Bouclé often looks mostly the same on both sides, so MARK the right side of each pattern piece! You can use tape (such as painter’s tape), or safety pins, but I use two straight pins arranged in a plus sign. I like to live dangerously. 😉 (Do you want 2 left sleeves? If not, mark the right side!)
  • Once you’ve cut the pattern pieces, use a light touch. Don’t over handle it. (Some people immediately overlock the raw edges with a serger, but I don’t. If you do serge, be careful not to distort the edges.)
  • Stabilize seams, especially horizontal, curved, or diagonal seams, such as the shoulder and neckline. I stabilize with 1/4″ cotton twill tape. (I bought an 800 yard bolt years ago and it’s likely to last for the rest of my life.)
  • Contain the raw edges. As soon as I finish a seam, I contain it, in most cases with extra wide, double-fold bias tape.

    Did you know that this tape has a right side and a wrong side? The “right side”, the side that faces you as you sew it, is just a tad more narrow, as you can see in this cream-colored bias tape:
    The slightly longer underside increases the likelihood that it will be caught by the machine needle. I find it’s easier when I extend the tape so that it’s slightly longer than the seam, and hangs over beginning and the end. I trim it down later.

    I move the needle position closer to the edge of the tape, but this isn’t strictly required.
    Finally, I whipstitch the bias tape to the body of the coat. This is an optional step, but it gives the loosely-woven fabric more stability:

For the pattern, I used one of my TnT (Tried ‘n True) patterns, Butterick 6328:

Butterick 6328

I successfully used this pattern for another Britex project, a Burberry-inspired coat dress. Using a TnT pattern means you don’t have to spend time altering for fit—you can go straight to playing with the design.

I still spent time dithering on exactly how I wanted this coat to look. Some of the options I considered but didn’t use: black sleeves, no trim along front and neck edges, fringe on the armholes, fancy (embellished) trim (instead of plain), bias fringe around the pockets. This pic shows the result playtime:

Besides the changes from the last time, I made some additional style changes:

  • Lengthened to mid calf length.
  • Outlined the neck, fronts, and armhole edges with a textured wool-blend, doubleknit fabric purchased at Britex. This fabulous fabric, alas, is not on their website.
  • Added self fringe to the hem and sleeves.
  • Closed with 3 toggles, purchased at Britex.
  • Added oversized, lined patch pockets.
  • Cut the sleeves on the bias. This means I don’t have to match the stripe across the body, but that’s not why I do it. I do it because straight lines that extend from arm to arm (the entire width of my body), creates visual chunkiness and emphasizes my width. The diagonal lines of the bias sleeves break it up a bit, creating a more flattering line.

Making self fringe

Here are a few tips if you want to replicate the self fringe:

  • I cut strips of fabric, along the selvedge, 3-1/2″ wide. I used the selvedge because it is more stable, though this isn’t strictly necessary. You could stabilize this edge in other ways. The selvedge edge is sewn to the coat. These are the strips I cut for the sleeves (the selvedge edge has the white seam):
  • I cut the strips along the grain. The cross-grain is not as pleasing because the warp threads are uniformly thin. The weft threads are more varied. This pic shows cross-grain fringe:
  • I use the blunt end of a substantial needle to ease out one or two threads at a time. I pull the threads from the center of the strip, as I find that works better than pulling from an end. The threads are less likely to break, but it also causes less distortion to the ends of the strips.
  • These two loops are the next to be pulled:
  • The strip for the bottom of the coat is ready to be applied:
  • Right sides together, I stitch the trim to the sleeve with a 5/8″ seam. Once I open it up, it hangs like this:
  • Until I turn the raw edges up and secure:

I’m starting to pull together my wardrobe for Japan, and this coat may come along.

A few more pics:

That looks like an in seam pocket, right? It’s a carefully applied patch pocket. I spent time dithering on whether to outline the pocket with fringe, but decided to stick with a cleaner line.
I like that the bust darts are placed precisely inside a black stripe
I purchased three of these toggles at Britex. I placed one near the top, another at my full bust, and the third at the waist. To make them less obvious (and preserve the clean line of the coat), I placed each one in a black stripe.
Did I mention there’s a fair amount of hand sewing in this coat? I find hand sewing to be very therapeutic, and bouclé is wonderful for “absorbing” the hand stitches, but you don’t have to construct it that way!
Thanks to Britex for this wonderful striped bouclé! I purchased all other supplies.
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Free Project – Patchwork bell sleeve crochet top Pattern

Free Project – Patchwork bell sleeve crochet top Pattern

PATTERN DETAILS This pattern is easy for beginners. It is includes 3 motif written descriptions , 3 motif charts, assambley diagrams for each size and diagram how to join motifs. The pattern is suitable for plus size women. Yarn: either 100% Cotton 4 ply Pattons 330m-361yds/100g or Tivoli Cruise 4 ply 100% cotton 339m/100g or […]

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Free Project – Hello Autumn

Free Project – Hello Autumn

PATTERN DETAILS Pumpkin spice and everything nice! That’s how we feel about Autumn and all that is glorious about fall. So pour yourself a cup of hot tea, cozy up with your favorite blanket and stitch this fall-tastic pattern right on your mobile device or tablet via our GOGO Cross Stitch app! Download Now

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