Tag Archive: Craft

Grey Flower Dress

Hello again!  I must say that I really needed this past vacation!  My dad came out to visit us and we hung out, went to NYC and watched Chicago while we were out there.  The babies really do love their grandpaw.  (grad-paw cuz they are puppies! Well I think it is cute.) I also tried…

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Grey Flower Dress

Hello again!  I must say that I really needed this past vacation!  My dad came out to visit us and we hung out, went to NYC and watched Chicago while we were out there.  The babies really do love their grandpaw.  (grad-paw cuz they are puppies! Well I think it is cute.) I also tried…

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Lace Table Cloths

Hello again!  This past week(s) I’ve been on vacation and finally have had some time to finish up a lot of projects I started and never really got around to finishing.  These lace table cloths and runners I am making are for a clients wedding.  They bought all the lace in various lengths because that…

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Lace Table Cloths

Hello again!  This past week(s) I’ve been on vacation and finally have had some time to finish up a lot of projects I started and never really got around to finishing.  These lace table cloths and runners I am making are for a clients wedding.  They bought all the lace in various lengths because that…

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Woven Beaded Bracelets

Our Woven Beaded Bracelets look like something you’re maybe not allowed to touch, like they…

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BRK and BRP, Pwned

Brioche got served today.  It’s been taunting me for 12 years, lurking in the back corners of my brain since I was a new knitter and tried to knit this Interweave sweater pattern.  It is an awesome design, but was not at all beginner-compatible.  It did, however, turn out to be rage-compatible.

tried again 7 years ago.  Same sweater, same doofy issues.  There was a flurry of needles and yarn, maybe an expletive, and somehow I ended up with a perfectly fitting Oatmeal sweater (by Jane Richmond) in 70’s potholder colored yarn.  I got destroyed by Brioche, again. I keep meaning to dye that Oatmeal…

Then I took a Stripes class with Veera Välimäki.  If anyone could heal me of my brioche skills deficiency, surely she could.  I so wish I’d taken a pic of the knitted puke I created that day.  All I have is this photo of the humble set-up row, which looks normal.

Trust me, though, when I say it was bad.  Veera patted my shoulder and said, “It’s okay.  You’ll get it.”  It’s not her fault.  It’s Brioche’s.

All that is to say that I have finally arrived, my knitting friends!  I decided to set aside a whole morning/ afternoon/ some of the evening to figure out the Marley shawl pattern by Andrea Mowry.  She’s got all these great patterns, but the hitch is that many require knowledge of this infuriating stitch.

So, I did it and I have these photos to prove it.  Of course, I did have to re-knit this beginning part two times after taking these photos because I still can’t read my stitches well enough to fix mistakes.  But, brioche… brioche!

I read Andrea’s directions over and over, watched a ton of tutorials and then checked this Briochestitch site, where it finally clicked.  I don’t know why.  It pretty much said just what my pattern did.  Maybe it was a day full of stitch immersion that did it.  Anyway, now I am ready for all these “Hot Right Now” brioche thingies.
Bring it, Andrea and Stephen!

By the way, don’t you love this golden snitch progress keeper from Owls on Dantes?  
(more on ravelry, instagram, and flickr)
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Suit Pants to Vest

I am back! I hope you all have been a little more successful in your sewing and crafting endeavors than I have been lately.  Above is the vest in regular light after a second run of pressing. The bride really wanted a vest for the groom, but the consultant that they were working with completely ignored…

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14 Magical Fairy Gardens You Can Make

14 Magical Fairy Gardens You Can MakeFairy gardens are so much fun! The possibilities for these enchanting little gardens are endless. You can make them entirely yourself or buy some of the parts already made. They can be so small they fit in a pot or take up a huge spot under a backyard tree. It’s totally up to you. My…

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The post 14 Magical Fairy Gardens You Can Make appeared first on Kids Activities Blog.

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12 Subscription Craft Boxes for Kids Compared

10 Craft and Activity Subscription Boxes For Kids Compared on Kids Activities BlogUPDATE:  I started this post over 4 years ago because I had a question on which subscription box for kids would be best for MY kids.  I figured if I had that question, others did!  There are SO MANY subscription boxes! Over the years, many have arrived at my mailbox and my kids have willingly…

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The post 12 Subscription Craft Boxes for Kids Compared appeared first on Kids Activities Blog.

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Make a Fruit Garland Bird Feeder!

fruit garland string bird feederMy kids love to Make a Fruit Garland Bird Feeder to feed the birds and other wildlife! Most people are familiar with fruit garlands and they are so easy to make. You simply string fruit up on a string and hang it up in a tree. We added popcorn to our fruit string bird feeder…

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The post Make a Fruit Garland Bird Feeder! appeared first on Kids Activities Blog.

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Baby Granny Stripe Blanket

I guess I can post this blanket now that it’s been gifted and the recipient has been born.  It made me so happy to think of the loving home she would grow up in as I worked on this blanket.  I was also excited that her parents loved it becaus…

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So Much Seed Stitch, Then a Rant

How have I been knitting for 15+ years and still not yet knit a Wool and the Gang pattern?  Weird, huh? So the Julia Sweater is my first one.  It’s also been in my WIP basket for six months.  I realized this when I we…

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Knitting Throwback

The daily prompts in the Yarn Love Challenge have taken me back through my knitting history-  from those days when I knew no crafters but said I wanted to learn to knit so my husband gave me a booklet from Joann called How to Crochet for Christmas…

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Yarn Love Challenge: Intros and Such

The Yarn Love Challenge on Instagram started this month, with intros.  I joined a few days late and threw a selfie up on instagram as Day 1 but didn’t really introduce myself.  Eh, I don’t know if I’ll actually do that now either. I had this …

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I Think I’m a Crocheter

There was that baby Superman cape and there was that really cool Holla Knits scarf, where I did feel like I had a rhythm going by the time it was finished.  Those are my only real experiences with crochet.  It felt like I was fumbling my way through those projects, my stitches just happy accidents.

But now, I am finishing stripe after stripe on this baby blanket in a fluid, effortless way.  I think I am a crocheter.

I knew I wanted to start a granny stripe blanket out of sock yarn scraps, with Nicky’s Christmas to Christmas Crochet-along.  But there was someone I really wanted to make a baby gift for and a worsted scrap blanket is a baby gift I know that I’d love to receive.  I like baby knits that aren’t in the traditional baby pastels.  I also knew worsted weight yarn would crochet up fairly quickly.  I think I’m over a quarter of the way through today.  That’s in four days of crocheting.  That’s insane!!!

Um, yeah, I’ll be knitting one with sock yarn too.  You know how on podcasts knitters will show you each individual square and say what yarn it is?  My husband squints like he’s listening to nails on a chalkboard when they do this, and, if I’m honest, I usually tune it all out.

So you completely have that option.  Squint away or scroll on down past where I make note of the yarns I’m using for my own neurotic pleasure.

From the top where I’m working to the bottom:

WotA Tweed from my Bradway shawl,
Up in Yarns Murkwood from my Laura + Maddy Mitts,
Gynx Yarns Targhee dk in Goth Girl from Goldfinch,
Cascade purple from Everett Henley,
Patterns Classic Tweed in Aran from Blowing Snow,
Quince and Co Lark in Clay,
January Yarns Olivia for the Karite Hat,
Tosh Dk in Earl Grey (sigh) from my Zelda shawl,
Beautiful Red Sock Blue Sock yarn for a Prim hat,
Malabrigo in Paris Night from my Thing to Wear Cardigan,
Junkyarn dk Diana from my Dresden Beret,
Patons in Natural Mix from my Cherry Pie sweater,
Gynx Yarns in Spanish Roof (a favorite of mine) from my Petawawa Toque,
more lark,
more Gynx Targhee in Goth Girl,
Voolenvine Yarns non-superwash in Gashlycrumb from the Quadri hat,
Malabrigo in Plomo again,
and Patons Tweed in Aran again.

Okay, now I’ll go back to being cool.  Because saying phrases like “scrappy baby granny stripe blanket” is too cool for school.

I think I feel more sentimental about these scraps than I would sock yarn, just because I’ve been knitting with worsted since the beginning and some of these are from older projects.  The wild thing is that they can all look good together in this blanket.  When I brought them to a Stripes class with Veera Välmäki, a few years ago, they looked like puke.

The email for the class said to bring scraps, so I really brought scraps- a bag full.  When the class began, I pulled out my somewhat tangled balls of workhorse yarns in chartreuse, light purple, brown, etc.  All the other participants pulled out gleaming cakes of Madelinetosh in coordinating colors.  Bunch of kiss ups.  No, they were really nice.  They all gave me encouraging and compassionate smiles as I spazzed out with my tangled brioche section.  I think I was the remedial knitting student.

For this blanket, I am keeping them in color groups of 3 or 4 stripes- blues, purples, reds, etc.  I am using a couple of new skeins of Quince and Co Lark in Clay for unifying stripes, every several stripes.  It will probably be the edging color too.   I want a hat in Clay.  Clay, Sedum, and Damson are all colors I want to work with.

I want this to be a travel project, and maybe it can since it’s a baby knit.  Dana (a crochet blanket master) had the clever idea of making a big ball of scraps, already magic knotted, so it would be more portable.  I think I’ll try that, too.  But I will have to unravel one row to see what length I need for a row’s worth of one color, since I am changing color with every stripe.  As it is, I would have to bring a big bag of scraps with me.

So, what are your scrappy projects?  If you don’t have any, consider joining us in Clara Peggoty’s Corner.  It’s not a Ravelry supergroup, with a bazillion members, but that’s refreshing.  I like being part of a group that’s not so overwhelming that members can’t keep up with each other.  We’re also on Instagram as #ChristmastoChristmasCAL

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Teal Box-Pleat Skirt

These box pleat skirts are seriously my favorites.  I will be making a tutorial soon.  I just need to find another fabric perfect for one. The fabric is a brocade that I used a while ago when I made a pencil-dress.  The best part about this skirt is that, like Sam’s, IT HAS POCKETS!  You…

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Find Your Fade

I wasn’t always comfortable with trusting my instincts, and I don’t just mean when knitting a piece of clothing.  Sometime, within the last several years, I have shrugged off the cloak of doubt that doused my impulses.  I still consider and l…

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Concert Dress Refashion

This was my high school concert band dress.  I loved this thing, but ever since high school I have only worn it once and that was in college when I was stuck in the basic concert band for a semester instead of my Major which was jazz.  This dress has soo many amazing memories and…

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Sam’s Coral Skirt!

Everyone meet Sam!  She is my first friend that I made when we moved out to New Jersey last year.  We worked together and she really loved some of my clothes, so for Christmas I decided to make her a custom-one-of-a-kind skirt! The fabric is from mood, it is a coral quilted cotton. I made…

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Whatever I Feel Like I Wanna Do, Gosh!

Napoleon said it best.  That’s going to be me this year, and not just when it comes to crafting. I found my Fade.  From top left, clockwise: Madelinetosh- Reindeer, Knit Picks Stroll- Raven, Tanis Fiber Arts- Too Tartan, Madelinetosh- Chickor…

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Free Class – How to Create a Rounded Strip Valentines Box

Free Class – How to Create a Rounded Strip Valentines Box

Today Owain and Alison from Tonic Studios will walk you through the step-by-step process of creating this beautiful 6×6 Valentine Box using the Rounded Strip Box Die. Perfect for gift giving or holding treats and treasures for Valentine’s Day. Download Now

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Grey Puppy Kennel Covers

My puppy sitter is the best ever! She takes care of our pups and they love her, so do we.  I made her kennel covers a couple months ago, and she needed some more!  If you live in the south Jersey area near Mt. Laurel you can check out her info HERE and HERE. Above…

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Blue Window Dress

This year has started out with a full on sprint.  Trey and I are moving to a 2-bedroom apartment in March where I will take over the second bedroom and make it a sewing room.  (It will also be a Study with a couch and our 4 bookshelves… but I GET MY OWN LITTLE STUDIO!!!)…

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New Stockings!

Wow it has really been a while since my last post.  Now it is time to play a little catch-up over the next couple weeks over what I have been doing the past couple months. First up is I made some new stockings for the 2 cute fuzzy additions to our family! The top two…

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New Stockings!

Wow it has really been a while since my last post.  Now it is time to play a little catch-up over the next couple weeks over what I have been doing the past couple months. First up is I made some new stockings for the 2 cute fuzzy additions to our family! The top two…

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Thought Process + Some Links

I have been typing away all week on the keyboard of my computer working on the re-writes for my editor. It is a slog. Many years ago, I read a quote from Patricia Wells, one of my fave cookbook authors. She said something about you have to just sit the…

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Everything I know about knitting socks can fit in this box.

The Year of the Sock came and went.  I’m finally ready to post photos of something besides socks.  That’s a good thing because I think all of my non-knitting friends were beginning to think I had a weirdo sock fetish.  It’s all worth it, though, to know that I persevered and knit 12 pairs of socks for the Box o Sox Knit-along before Jan 1 and I learned exactly what I like in a sock.

Note: There will be a bizarre number of photos because I wanted to catch all of the labels.  Oh, and there will be a few more socks.

Look at them, all rolled up, shiny and un-pilled.
Look at them, mocking me with their floppy cuffs and dropped stitches that weren’t discovered until the ends were woven.

I probably wouldn’t have found it so difficult to complete this project if I didn’t overcommit with knit-alongs and gift knitting, etc.  But, it’s done and I’m pleased to say that every pair fits perfectly, at least in the foot.  It’s just those toe-up cuffs that seem loose.

This occasion called for a special box, so I gathered some of my yarn labels and decoupaged them to an old Gola shoe box.  I truly did feel like a weirdo after that quick little project turned into hours of tediousness, with glue all over my fingers and a crick in my neck.

Had I realized another knitter had already glued yarn labels to her box, I wouldn’t even have finished.  But, I’m kind of glad I did because they were just taking up space in my supplies box and it’s nice to have a readily visible memento of the yarns I’ve used.  A couple are even from ones I haven’t used yet.  I may regret doing that…

Mine is also a little different in that these are many labels I’ve been saving for years, from all sorts of yarn.  It’s not BoxoSox-specific.  It also required many, many layers of Mod Podge.  (Insert Eyeroll)

Here’s the rundown on my Year of the Sock:
I tried to hit on most of the techniques I’d heard of, and a few I hadn’t.  At first, it was just a basic cuff-down (Graynbow socks).  Then I broadened to knitting toe-up and two-at-a-time (Two at Once, Toe Up, Magic Loop socks).  For those, I also did a new cast on that involved knitting into the purl bumps of half the usual amount of stitches in order to easily get started with magic loop.

I took a break from regular socks to knit myself and my husband lopi house shoes.  This was a true break, as it was bulky and rustic yarn- completely different in my hands (Inniskór Slippers).  They didn’t really qualify for the Box o Sox KAL, but to me they completely count.

I wanted to try patterns that intimidated me a little, with all of the cables and lace (Springtastic Socks, Wildflowers and Honeycomb, and Fine and Dandy).  It was in doing this that I realized a 56 stitch count sock fits me best, but if more are necessary for a pattern, they look fine when it’s a shorter length sock.  I also decided I like shorter 4″ cuffs best.

I tried contrast heels/ toes/ and cuffs (Wildflowers and Honeycomb, Fine and Dandy, Confetti and Champagná) and even did a weird thing by cutting a self-striping yarn to sort of get a contrast heel.  That was a mess.

I enjoyed using variegated yarn for vanilla socks (Hydrangea Socks, Shield Maiden Socks,  I Heart Bees and Vintage Christmas Socks) and for the most patterned sock I’ve ever seen (Springtastic Socks).  And I liked it.  Then there were speckled socks (Speckled Space Socks), which I’ve always wanted to knit.

There were stripes aplenty this year and I’m sure there’ll be more in my future, especially since learning the afterthought heel.

Somewhere along the way I decided to order a 9″ circular and try it on a stockinette sock (Hydrangea Socks).  I didn’t even make it halfway through the first sock.  It was like begging for arthritis.  Size 0 or 1 circulars are torturous enough for me.  So, it’s magic loop for me from now on and, since realizing I knit each of my I Heart Bees socks using a different needle size, I decided I do better when knitting both socks at once.

The Smooth Operator Socks pattern gave me plenty of practice with that technique.  It’s meant to make knitting a “vanilla” sock as easy as possible.  There were a lot of variations to try within the pattern, so I first tried the basic, long version of the pattern, which includes afterthought heels.  (Confetti and Champagná).  For this I learned to properly cast on two 56 stitch cuffs for knitting at once.  I don’t know why I never took the time to do it all at once before this.

The next time, I added self-striping heels on self-striping socks and did them with a no-Kitchener method (Gynx’s Palette Socks).  Next there was the no-Kitchener toe and gap-less afterthought heel (Shield Maiden Socks).  And lastly, I applied most of those techniques to a pair of toe-up socks (Vintage Christmas Socks).

So, I think I learned about 4 different heel methods: regular slip stitch, eye of partridge, a horizontal slip stitch, and afterthought heels.

There were three toe methods, too: Kitchener, that odd, even decrease, and the no-Kitchener method.  (Neither of the last two require a Kitchener stitch.)

All of this is to say that I have my own personal sock recipe. Me!  I remember reading about other knitters formulating them and thinking there was no way I’d ever be that comfortable knitting socks.  I thought I’d always be glued to a pattern and walking around in floppy socks.  Apparently, I’ll just be walking around with floppy cuffs.  A win!

My Sock Recipe, because this blog is where I store things:

I prefer size US 0 circulars, sport weight sock yarn or a plump fingering weight.

If I’m planning on doing a contrast heel I figured I need 7g of a different yarn.  I’ll need no more than 20g to do cuffs and toes too.
If I’m using a different portion of the same self-striping yarn as a contrast heel, I should unwind it from the ball before casting on.

I cast on 56 stitches for my feet.
My actual foot is 9 3/4 ” from toes to back of heels.

For toe-up socks:

Judy’s Magic Cast-on, possibly two at a time.  But I did try knitting into the purl bumps of a 12 stitch cast on the create 24 sts.  This makes two-at-time, magic loop easier.

For traditional heel gussets:
I knit 5 3/4″ from toe to beginning of gussets.
At heel flap, change color.
I like slip stitch and eye of partridge heel flaps.

If it’s an afterthought heel:
Use high contrast yarn as waste yarn, knitting more than the usual row (as per Smooth Operator)
I knit 7.5″ from toe to waste yarn.
When knitting in the heel, use the gap-less method (also Smooth Operator)

I liked 4″ cuffs best, but anywhere from 4-6″ is fine for a normal sock.
2″ cuff, in 2×2 rib.
Jeny’s Surprisingly Stretchy Bind-off is the best I’ve found so far.  But I have to make sure I don’t cast off loosely.

If I’m knitting cuff-down socks, my preference:
Cast on both cuffs at once.
I prefer a 4-6″ leg.  4″ works really well with hi-tops.
2″ of 1×1 twisted rib looks really nice, but 2×2 rib is my favorite.

For cuff-down afterthoughts (my favorite) – Use high contrast waste yarn to mark heel and knit more than the usual waste rows.
Use gap-less method.
After heel or waste yarn, knit 5.5″ from waste yarn to toe decreases

For traditional gusset heels– knit 3 7/8 ” from gussets to toe decreases.

Toes:
I prefer binding off at 24 stitches for a less pointed toe.
Either a rounded decrease (as per Smooth Operator) or traditional Kitchener.  I usually reinforce the toe as I weave in my ends.

And that’s it… The year of the sock is officially over.  2017 will be the year of whatever I feel like I wanna do.

And now I’m putting my size 0 needles away for a looooooong time.  I might, just maybe, try to knit some of the sock patterns I used last year in worsted weight yarn for stockings (like Tracie of The Grocery Girls).  But only if I feel like it.

Oh, and happy New Year, bloggy friends!!

(more on Ravelry, Kollabora, Instagram, and Flickr)

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Everything I know about knitting socks can fit in this box.

The Year of the Sock came and went.  I’m finally ready to post photos of something besides socks.  That’s a good thing because I think all of my non-knitting friends were beginning to think I had a weirdo sock fetish.  It’s all worth it, though, to know that I persevered and knit 12 pairs of socks for the Box o Sox Knit-along before Jan 1 and I learned exactly what I like in a sock.

Note: There will be a bizarre number of photos because I wanted to catch all of the labels.  Oh, and there will be a few more socks.

Look at them, all rolled up, shiny and un-pilled.
Look at them, mocking me with their floppy cuffs and dropped stitches that weren’t discovered until the ends were woven.

I probably wouldn’t have found it so difficult to complete this project if I didn’t overcommit with knit-alongs and gift knitting, etc.  But, it’s done and I’m pleased to say that every pair fits perfectly, at least in the foot.  It’s just those toe-up cuffs that seem loose.

This occasion called for a special box, so I gathered some of my yarn labels and decoupaged them to an old Gola shoe box.  I truly did feel like a weirdo after that quick little project turned into hours of tediousness, with glue all over my fingers and a crick in my neck.

Had I realized another knitter had already glued yarn labels to her box, I wouldn’t even have finished.  But, I’m kind of glad I did because they were just taking up space in my supplies box and it’s nice to have a readily visible memento of the yarns I’ve used.  A couple are even from ones I haven’t used yet.  I may regret doing that…

Mine is also a little different in that these are many labels I’ve been saving for years, from all sorts of yarn.  It’s not BoxoSox-specific.  It also required many, many layers of Mod Podge.  (Insert Eyeroll)

Here’s the rundown on my Year of the Sock:
I tried to hit on most of the techniques I’d heard of, and a few I hadn’t.  At first, it was just a basic cuff-down (Graynbow socks).  Then I broadened to knitting toe-up and two-at-a-time (Two at Once, Toe Up, Magic Loop socks).  For those, I also did a new cast on that involved knitting into the purl bumps of half the usual amount of stitches in order to easily get started with magic loop.

I took a break from regular socks to knit myself and my husband lopi house shoes.  This was a true break, as it was bulky and rustic yarn- completely different in my hands (Inniskór Slippers).  They didn’t really qualify for the Box o Sox KAL, but to me they completely count.

I wanted to try patterns that intimidated me a little, with all of the cables and lace (Springtastic Socks, Wildflowers and Honeycomb, and Fine and Dandy).  It was in doing this that I realized a 56 stitch count sock fits me best, but if more are necessary for a pattern, they look fine when it’s a shorter length sock.  I also decided I like shorter 4″ cuffs best.

I tried contrast heels/ toes/ and cuffs (Wildflowers and Honeycomb, Fine and Dandy, Confetti and Champagná) and even did a weird thing by cutting a self-striping yarn to sort of get a contrast heel.  That was a mess.

I enjoyed using variegated yarn for vanilla socks (Hydrangea Socks, Shield Maiden Socks,  I Heart Bees and Vintage Christmas Socks) and for the most patterned sock I’ve ever seen (Springtastic Socks).  And I liked it.  Then there were speckled socks (Speckled Space Socks), which I’ve always wanted to knit.

There were stripes aplenty this year and I’m sure there’ll be more in my future, especially since learning the afterthought heel.

Somewhere along the way I decided to order a 9″ circular and try it on a stockinette sock (Hydrangea Socks).  I didn’t even make it halfway through the first sock.  It was like begging for arthritis.  Size 0 or 1 circulars are torturous enough for me.  So, it’s magic loop for me from now on and, since realizing I knit each of my I Heart Bees socks using a different needle size, I decided I do better when knitting both socks at once.

The Smooth Operator Socks pattern gave me plenty of practice with that technique.  It’s meant to make knitting a “vanilla” sock as easy as possible.  There were a lot of variations to try within the pattern, so I first tried the basic, long version of the pattern, which includes afterthought heels.  (Confetti and Champagná).  For this I learned to properly cast on two 56 stitch cuffs for knitting at once.  I don’t know why I never took the time to do it all at once before this.

The next time, I added self-striping heels on self-striping socks and did them with a no-Kitchener method (Gynx’s Palette Socks).  Next there was the no-Kitchener toe and gap-less afterthought heel (Shield Maiden Socks).  And lastly, I applied most of those techniques to a pair of toe-up socks (Vintage Christmas Socks).

So, I think I learned about 4 different heel methods: regular slip stitch, eye of partridge, a horizontal slip stitch, and afterthought heels.

There were three toe methods, too: Kitchener, that odd, even decrease, and the no-Kitchener method.  (Neither of the last two require a Kitchener stitch.)

All of this is to say that I have my own personal sock recipe. Me!  I remember reading about other knitters formulating them and thinking there was no way I’d ever be that comfortable knitting socks.  I thought I’d always be glued to a pattern and walking around in floppy socks.  Apparently, I’ll just be walking around with floppy cuffs.  A win!

My Sock Recipe, because this blog is where I store things:

I prefer size US 0 circulars, sport weight sock yarn or a plump fingering weight.

If I’m planning on doing a contrast heel I figured I need 7g of a different yarn.  I’ll need no more than 20g to do cuffs and toes too.
If I’m using a different portion of the same self-striping yarn as a contrast heel, I should unwind it from the ball before casting on.

I cast on 56 stitches for my feet.
My actual foot is 9 3/4 ” from toes to back of heels.

For toe-up socks:

Judy’s Magic Cast-on, possibly two at a time.  But I did try knitting into the purl bumps of a 12 stitch cast on the create 24 sts.  This makes two-at-time, magic loop easier.

For traditional heel gussets:
I knit 5 3/4″ from toe to beginning of gussets.
At heel flap, change color.
I like slip stitch and eye of partridge heel flaps.

If it’s an afterthought heel:
Use high contrast yarn as waste yarn, knitting more than the usual row (as per Smooth Operator)
I knit 7.5″ from toe to waste yarn.
When knitting in the heel, use the gap-less method (also Smooth Operator)

I liked 4″ cuffs best, but anywhere from 4-6″ is fine for a normal sock.
2″ cuff, in 2×2 rib.
Jeny’s Surprisingly Stretchy Bind-off is the best I’ve found so far.  But I have to make sure I don’t cast off loosely.

If I’m knitting cuff-down socks, my preference:
Cast on both cuffs at once.
I prefer a 4-6″ leg.  4″ works really well with hi-tops.
2″ of 1×1 twisted rib looks really nice, but 2×2 rib is my favorite.

For cuff-down afterthoughts (my favorite) – Use high contrast waste yarn to mark heel and knit more than the usual waste rows.
Use gap-less method.
After heel or waste yarn, knit 5.5″ from waste yarn to toe decreases

For traditional gusset heels– knit 3 7/8 ” from gussets to toe decreases.

Toes:
I prefer binding off at 24 stitches for a less pointed toe.
Either a rounded decrease (as per Smooth Operator) or traditional Kitchener.  I usually reinforce the toe as I weave in my ends.

And that’s it… The year of the sock is officially over.  2017 will be the year of whatever I feel like I wanna do.

And now I’m putting my size 0 needles away for a looooooong time.  I might, just maybe, try to knit some of the sock patterns I used last year in worsted weight yarn for stockings (like Tracie of The Grocery Girls).  But only if I feel like it.

Oh, and happy New Year, bloggy friends!!

(more on Ravelry, Kollabora, Instagram, and Flickr)

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Speckled Space Socks

I finished this pair of Speckled Space Socks that make me think of Viper Pilots’ Wings about a week ago, then immediately cast on for pairs 11 and 12.  On a deadline here for Box o Sox.  So let me tell you about them, because I know…

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11 Holiday Cupcake Liner Crafts

11 Holiday Cupcake Liner CraftsCupcake liner crafts are by far one of my most favorite kids activity because they are so easy! Kids can get really creative with these and make all sorts of fun things. It’s exciting to show kids they can take a piece of paper normally used for baking and turn it into something awesome. Here…

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The post 11 Holiday Cupcake Liner Crafts appeared first on Kids Activities Blog.

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