Tag Archive: linkage

Cumberland

…And just before the deadline for the Brooklyn Knitfolk Hipster KAL, I finished my Cumberland.  I love it.  The end. You wish I was that brief.  No, I have to post too many photos and lots of “loves” and “reallys”.  At least I kno…

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Saguaro Blossom Hat

The last hat I indulged in during the Any Hat KAL is the Saguaro Blossom Hat by Anne Podlesak.  I found this pattern in her Free Spirit Knits book, during an Interweave sale,  Have you seen the patterns from this book?  I am amazed …

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When knitting is your comfort, and I interviewed Alina Schneider

Since we are hunkered down at home, awaiting more rains from Hurricane Harvey, I have gotten quite a bit of knitting done.  (We are fine.  We may get a bit of water in the house, but nothing catastrophic.)  Of course, most of it has been…

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Gingerbread Sweater aka Like Wearing Kittens, if That Were a Good Thing

I had high hopes of taking interesting photos of this sweater while on hiking vacation in The Grand Tetons.  But just because I am surrounded by landscape that’s beautiful, it doesn’t assure great photos of myself in knitwear.  In other words…

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Gathered Around Me

I’m still working on my Marley shawl, but my Gather, another Andrea Mowry design, is now complete.  It isn’t easy to stand outside in a wool/ linen shawl right now.  It’s not easy to stand outside, period.  I toughed it out for…

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The Orri Shawl

I am fresh from family vacation, where I had no connection with the outside world for about 2 weeks.   It wasn’t the kind of vacation that’s all about relaxing.  It was more the making up for lost time kind of trip,and it was really good. &nb…

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Hipster KAL

I knew I would be taking part in the Summer Sweater KAL, that’s a given.  But when I heard Brooklyn Knitfolk’s Jaclyn talk about how over “fade” projects she is and how she’s starting the Hipster KAL for lesser known knitting designs, I …

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Summer Sweater Knit-along Plans

I’m so excited about the beginning of the Summer Sweater KAL!  I had a million things on the
needles in June, but now I’m down to six.  This is really good, my friends.  I expect 2 will be off the needles by the time I return from vacation.  Of course, all of this maturity has given me the urge to go insane planning more projects than I can possibly manage for this KAL.   And planning more road tripping knitting than will comfortably fit in my car.  And pretending I’ll have room for two projects in my backpack on our hike.

Why don’t you hop a ride on the Crazy Train and pretend with me.  All images are linked to their ravelry pages so you can go a little nuts too.

There’s Journey, which may be finished before the KAL begins

Heritage will be what I begin with the group on Cast On day.  I’m knitting it in a tonal gray.

The Feya cardigan, by Amy Christoffers, will be my second cast on for the KAL.  This totally makes me think of high school.

Speaking of high school, Libby Jonson’s Timely makes me think of cardigans I wore then, too.  I want a navy and white striped version.

I’m dying to try knitting a fingering weight yarn held together with a lace weight mohair, like in Soirée

The Sourcebook Chunky Cardigan needs no flowery description.

Then, I want a Quadrillion, but not a regular Quadrillion.  It has to have a neckline exactly like Alaina’s (below).  Luckily she and other raveler’s have detailed notes.

Then there’s the classic Boxy sweater by Joji, the v-neck version.

Again, I want to copy Isabell.

What will you be knitting for your Summer Sweater?

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Some Jewelry

Maybe you have noticed the jewelry I wear in some of my blog posts.  I don’t know, maybe no one reads blogs anymore.  But, I’ve had these photos of some of my favorite Native Clutter jewelry for a long time, meaning to tell you guys…

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BRK and BRP, Pwned

Brioche got served today.  It’s been taunting me for 12 years, lurking in the back corners of my brain since I was a new knitter and tried to knit this Interweave sweater pattern.  It is an awesome design, but was not at all beginner-compatible.  It did, however, turn out to be rage-compatible.

tried again 7 years ago.  Same sweater, same doofy issues.  There was a flurry of needles and yarn, maybe an expletive, and somehow I ended up with a perfectly fitting Oatmeal sweater (by Jane Richmond) in 70’s potholder colored yarn.  I got destroyed by Brioche, again. I keep meaning to dye that Oatmeal…

Then I took a Stripes class with Veera Välimäki.  If anyone could heal me of my brioche skills deficiency, surely she could.  I so wish I’d taken a pic of the knitted puke I created that day.  All I have is this photo of the humble set-up row, which looks normal.

Trust me, though, when I say it was bad.  Veera patted my shoulder and said, “It’s okay.  You’ll get it.”  It’s not her fault.  It’s Brioche’s.

All that is to say that I have finally arrived, my knitting friends!  I decided to set aside a whole morning/ afternoon/ some of the evening to figure out the Marley shawl pattern by Andrea Mowry.  She’s got all these great patterns, but the hitch is that many require knowledge of this infuriating stitch.

So, I did it and I have these photos to prove it.  Of course, I did have to re-knit this beginning part two times after taking these photos because I still can’t read my stitches well enough to fix mistakes.  But, brioche… brioche!

I read Andrea’s directions over and over, watched a ton of tutorials and then checked this Briochestitch site, where it finally clicked.  I don’t know why.  It pretty much said just what my pattern did.  Maybe it was a day full of stitch immersion that did it.  Anyway, now I am ready for all these “Hot Right Now” brioche thingies.
Bring it, Andrea and Stephen!

By the way, don’t you love this golden snitch progress keeper from Owls on Dantes?  
(more on ravelry, instagram, and flickr)
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Waterrock

Let me start by saying these photos are kind of the pits.  Ocean spray, as in the ferry- not the juice, got on my lens and it wouldn’t cooperate the rest of the day. Waterrock, by Jennifer Kelley of Appalachian Knits, is the perfect summer project…

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Kinton Tee

My daughter and I took a little day trip to Galveston as, sort of, an in-case-you-move-soon thing.  I didn’t want the summer to get away from us and miss an opportunity for some quality time.  Of course, I also pressured her to take photos of…

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Baby Granny Stripe Blanket

I guess I can post this blanket now that it’s been gifted and the recipient has been born.  It made me so happy to think of the loving home she would grow up in as I worked on this blanket.  I was also excited that her parents loved it becaus…

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Feyre

I could knit Feyre again.  And again.  It was that satisfying.  I was imitating the sample, knit in Brooklyn Tweed’s Newsprint.  I think the Patons Classic Aran and Dark Grey Marl colorways gave mine a similarly graphic look. &…

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Julia Sweater

I don’t know what happened.  I slipped this big sweater over my head and next thing I knew it was like the last 26 years were a dream.  What?  I’m 17 again, wearing guys’ sweaters with baggy… everything?Friends, I knit the biggest, sim…

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So Much Seed Stitch, Then a Rant

How have I been knitting for 15+ years and still not yet knit a Wool and the Gang pattern?  Weird, huh? So the Julia Sweater is my first one.  It’s also been in my WIP basket for six months.  I realized this when I we…

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Everything I know about knitting socks can fit in this box.

The Year of the Sock came and went.  I’m finally ready to post photos of something besides socks.  That’s a good thing because I think all of my non-knitting friends were beginning to think I had a weirdo sock fetish.  It’s all worth it, though, to know that I persevered and knit 12 pairs of socks for the Box o Sox Knit-along before Jan 1 and I learned exactly what I like in a sock.

Note: There will be a bizarre number of photos because I wanted to catch all of the labels.  Oh, and there will be a few more socks.

Look at them, all rolled up, shiny and un-pilled.
Look at them, mocking me with their floppy cuffs and dropped stitches that weren’t discovered until the ends were woven.

I probably wouldn’t have found it so difficult to complete this project if I didn’t overcommit with knit-alongs and gift knitting, etc.  But, it’s done and I’m pleased to say that every pair fits perfectly, at least in the foot.  It’s just those toe-up cuffs that seem loose.

This occasion called for a special box, so I gathered some of my yarn labels and decoupaged them to an old Gola shoe box.  I truly did feel like a weirdo after that quick little project turned into hours of tediousness, with glue all over my fingers and a crick in my neck.

Had I realized another knitter had already glued yarn labels to her box, I wouldn’t even have finished.  But, I’m kind of glad I did because they were just taking up space in my supplies box and it’s nice to have a readily visible memento of the yarns I’ve used.  A couple are even from ones I haven’t used yet.  I may regret doing that…

Mine is also a little different in that these are many labels I’ve been saving for years, from all sorts of yarn.  It’s not BoxoSox-specific.  It also required many, many layers of Mod Podge.  (Insert Eyeroll)

Here’s the rundown on my Year of the Sock:
I tried to hit on most of the techniques I’d heard of, and a few I hadn’t.  At first, it was just a basic cuff-down (Graynbow socks).  Then I broadened to knitting toe-up and two-at-a-time (Two at Once, Toe Up, Magic Loop socks).  For those, I also did a new cast on that involved knitting into the purl bumps of half the usual amount of stitches in order to easily get started with magic loop.

I took a break from regular socks to knit myself and my husband lopi house shoes.  This was a true break, as it was bulky and rustic yarn- completely different in my hands (Inniskór Slippers).  They didn’t really qualify for the Box o Sox KAL, but to me they completely count.

I wanted to try patterns that intimidated me a little, with all of the cables and lace (Springtastic Socks, Wildflowers and Honeycomb, and Fine and Dandy).  It was in doing this that I realized a 56 stitch count sock fits me best, but if more are necessary for a pattern, they look fine when it’s a shorter length sock.  I also decided I like shorter 4″ cuffs best.

I tried contrast heels/ toes/ and cuffs (Wildflowers and Honeycomb, Fine and Dandy, Confetti and Champagná) and even did a weird thing by cutting a self-striping yarn to sort of get a contrast heel.  That was a mess.

I enjoyed using variegated yarn for vanilla socks (Hydrangea Socks, Shield Maiden Socks,  I Heart Bees and Vintage Christmas Socks) and for the most patterned sock I’ve ever seen (Springtastic Socks).  And I liked it.  Then there were speckled socks (Speckled Space Socks), which I’ve always wanted to knit.

There were stripes aplenty this year and I’m sure there’ll be more in my future, especially since learning the afterthought heel.

Somewhere along the way I decided to order a 9″ circular and try it on a stockinette sock (Hydrangea Socks).  I didn’t even make it halfway through the first sock.  It was like begging for arthritis.  Size 0 or 1 circulars are torturous enough for me.  So, it’s magic loop for me from now on and, since realizing I knit each of my I Heart Bees socks using a different needle size, I decided I do better when knitting both socks at once.

The Smooth Operator Socks pattern gave me plenty of practice with that technique.  It’s meant to make knitting a “vanilla” sock as easy as possible.  There were a lot of variations to try within the pattern, so I first tried the basic, long version of the pattern, which includes afterthought heels.  (Confetti and Champagná).  For this I learned to properly cast on two 56 stitch cuffs for knitting at once.  I don’t know why I never took the time to do it all at once before this.

The next time, I added self-striping heels on self-striping socks and did them with a no-Kitchener method (Gynx’s Palette Socks).  Next there was the no-Kitchener toe and gap-less afterthought heel (Shield Maiden Socks).  And lastly, I applied most of those techniques to a pair of toe-up socks (Vintage Christmas Socks).

So, I think I learned about 4 different heel methods: regular slip stitch, eye of partridge, a horizontal slip stitch, and afterthought heels.

There were three toe methods, too: Kitchener, that odd, even decrease, and the no-Kitchener method.  (Neither of the last two require a Kitchener stitch.)

All of this is to say that I have my own personal sock recipe. Me!  I remember reading about other knitters formulating them and thinking there was no way I’d ever be that comfortable knitting socks.  I thought I’d always be glued to a pattern and walking around in floppy socks.  Apparently, I’ll just be walking around with floppy cuffs.  A win!

My Sock Recipe, because this blog is where I store things:

I prefer size US 0 circulars, sport weight sock yarn or a plump fingering weight.

If I’m planning on doing a contrast heel I figured I need 7g of a different yarn.  I’ll need no more than 20g to do cuffs and toes too.
If I’m using a different portion of the same self-striping yarn as a contrast heel, I should unwind it from the ball before casting on.

I cast on 56 stitches for my feet.
My actual foot is 9 3/4 ” from toes to back of heels.

For toe-up socks:

Judy’s Magic Cast-on, possibly two at a time.  But I did try knitting into the purl bumps of a 12 stitch cast on the create 24 sts.  This makes two-at-time, magic loop easier.

For traditional heel gussets:
I knit 5 3/4″ from toe to beginning of gussets.
At heel flap, change color.
I like slip stitch and eye of partridge heel flaps.

If it’s an afterthought heel:
Use high contrast yarn as waste yarn, knitting more than the usual row (as per Smooth Operator)
I knit 7.5″ from toe to waste yarn.
When knitting in the heel, use the gap-less method (also Smooth Operator)

I liked 4″ cuffs best, but anywhere from 4-6″ is fine for a normal sock.
2″ cuff, in 2×2 rib.
Jeny’s Surprisingly Stretchy Bind-off is the best I’ve found so far.  But I have to make sure I don’t cast off loosely.

If I’m knitting cuff-down socks, my preference:
Cast on both cuffs at once.
I prefer a 4-6″ leg.  4″ works really well with hi-tops.
2″ of 1×1 twisted rib looks really nice, but 2×2 rib is my favorite.

For cuff-down afterthoughts (my favorite) – Use high contrast waste yarn to mark heel and knit more than the usual waste rows.
Use gap-less method.
After heel or waste yarn, knit 5.5″ from waste yarn to toe decreases

For traditional gusset heels– knit 3 7/8 ” from gussets to toe decreases.

Toes:
I prefer binding off at 24 stitches for a less pointed toe.
Either a rounded decrease (as per Smooth Operator) or traditional Kitchener.  I usually reinforce the toe as I weave in my ends.

And that’s it… The year of the sock is officially over.  2017 will be the year of whatever I feel like I wanna do.

And now I’m putting my size 0 needles away for a looooooong time.  I might, just maybe, try to knit some of the sock patterns I used last year in worsted weight yarn for stockings (like Tracie of The Grocery Girls).  But only if I feel like it.

Oh, and happy New Year, bloggy friends!!

(more on Ravelry, Kollabora, Instagram, and Flickr)

read more

Everything I know about knitting socks can fit in this box.

The Year of the Sock came and went.  I’m finally ready to post photos of something besides socks.  That’s a good thing because I think all of my non-knitting friends were beginning to think I had a weirdo sock fetish.  It’s all worth it, though, to know that I persevered and knit 12 pairs of socks for the Box o Sox Knit-along before Jan 1 and I learned exactly what I like in a sock.

Note: There will be a bizarre number of photos because I wanted to catch all of the labels.  Oh, and there will be a few more socks.

Look at them, all rolled up, shiny and un-pilled.
Look at them, mocking me with their floppy cuffs and dropped stitches that weren’t discovered until the ends were woven.

I probably wouldn’t have found it so difficult to complete this project if I didn’t overcommit with knit-alongs and gift knitting, etc.  But, it’s done and I’m pleased to say that every pair fits perfectly, at least in the foot.  It’s just those toe-up cuffs that seem loose.

This occasion called for a special box, so I gathered some of my yarn labels and decoupaged them to an old Gola shoe box.  I truly did feel like a weirdo after that quick little project turned into hours of tediousness, with glue all over my fingers and a crick in my neck.

Had I realized another knitter had already glued yarn labels to her box, I wouldn’t even have finished.  But, I’m kind of glad I did because they were just taking up space in my supplies box and it’s nice to have a readily visible memento of the yarns I’ve used.  A couple are even from ones I haven’t used yet.  I may regret doing that…

Mine is also a little different in that these are many labels I’ve been saving for years, from all sorts of yarn.  It’s not BoxoSox-specific.  It also required many, many layers of Mod Podge.  (Insert Eyeroll)

Here’s the rundown on my Year of the Sock:
I tried to hit on most of the techniques I’d heard of, and a few I hadn’t.  At first, it was just a basic cuff-down (Graynbow socks).  Then I broadened to knitting toe-up and two-at-a-time (Two at Once, Toe Up, Magic Loop socks).  For those, I also did a new cast on that involved knitting into the purl bumps of half the usual amount of stitches in order to easily get started with magic loop.

I took a break from regular socks to knit myself and my husband lopi house shoes.  This was a true break, as it was bulky and rustic yarn- completely different in my hands (Inniskór Slippers).  They didn’t really qualify for the Box o Sox KAL, but to me they completely count.

I wanted to try patterns that intimidated me a little, with all of the cables and lace (Springtastic Socks, Wildflowers and Honeycomb, and Fine and Dandy).  It was in doing this that I realized a 56 stitch count sock fits me best, but if more are necessary for a pattern, they look fine when it’s a shorter length sock.  I also decided I like shorter 4″ cuffs best.

I tried contrast heels/ toes/ and cuffs (Wildflowers and Honeycomb, Fine and Dandy, Confetti and Champagná) and even did a weird thing by cutting a self-striping yarn to sort of get a contrast heel.  That was a mess.

I enjoyed using variegated yarn for vanilla socks (Hydrangea Socks, Shield Maiden Socks,  I Heart Bees and Vintage Christmas Socks) and for the most patterned sock I’ve ever seen (Springtastic Socks).  And I liked it.  Then there were speckled socks (Speckled Space Socks), which I’ve always wanted to knit.

There were stripes aplenty this year and I’m sure there’ll be more in my future, especially since learning the afterthought heel.

Somewhere along the way I decided to order a 9″ circular and try it on a stockinette sock (Hydrangea Socks).  I didn’t even make it halfway through the first sock.  It was like begging for arthritis.  Size 0 or 1 circulars are torturous enough for me.  So, it’s magic loop for me from now on and, since realizing I knit each of my I Heart Bees socks using a different needle size, I decided I do better when knitting both socks at once.

The Smooth Operator Socks pattern gave me plenty of practice with that technique.  It’s meant to make knitting a “vanilla” sock as easy as possible.  There were a lot of variations to try within the pattern, so I first tried the basic, long version of the pattern, which includes afterthought heels.  (Confetti and Champagná).  For this I learned to properly cast on two 56 stitch cuffs for knitting at once.  I don’t know why I never took the time to do it all at once before this.

The next time, I added self-striping heels on self-striping socks and did them with a no-Kitchener method (Gynx’s Palette Socks).  Next there was the no-Kitchener toe and gap-less afterthought heel (Shield Maiden Socks).  And lastly, I applied most of those techniques to a pair of toe-up socks (Vintage Christmas Socks).

So, I think I learned about 4 different heel methods: regular slip stitch, eye of partridge, a horizontal slip stitch, and afterthought heels.

There were three toe methods, too: Kitchener, that odd, even decrease, and the no-Kitchener method.  (Neither of the last two require a Kitchener stitch.)

All of this is to say that I have my own personal sock recipe. Me!  I remember reading about other knitters formulating them and thinking there was no way I’d ever be that comfortable knitting socks.  I thought I’d always be glued to a pattern and walking around in floppy socks.  Apparently, I’ll just be walking around with floppy cuffs.  A win!

My Sock Recipe, because this blog is where I store things:

I prefer size US 0 circulars, sport weight sock yarn or a plump fingering weight.

If I’m planning on doing a contrast heel I figured I need 7g of a different yarn.  I’ll need no more than 20g to do cuffs and toes too.
If I’m using a different portion of the same self-striping yarn as a contrast heel, I should unwind it from the ball before casting on.

I cast on 56 stitches for my feet.
My actual foot is 9 3/4 ” from toes to back of heels.

For toe-up socks:

Judy’s Magic Cast-on, possibly two at a time.  But I did try knitting into the purl bumps of a 12 stitch cast on the create 24 sts.  This makes two-at-time, magic loop easier.

For traditional heel gussets:
I knit 5 3/4″ from toe to beginning of gussets.
At heel flap, change color.
I like slip stitch and eye of partridge heel flaps.

If it’s an afterthought heel:
Use high contrast yarn as waste yarn, knitting more than the usual row (as per Smooth Operator)
I knit 7.5″ from toe to waste yarn.
When knitting in the heel, use the gap-less method (also Smooth Operator)

I liked 4″ cuffs best, but anywhere from 4-6″ is fine for a normal sock.
2″ cuff, in 2×2 rib.
Jeny’s Surprisingly Stretchy Bind-off is the best I’ve found so far.  But I have to make sure I don’t cast off loosely.

If I’m knitting cuff-down socks, my preference:
Cast on both cuffs at once.
I prefer a 4-6″ leg.  4″ works really well with hi-tops.
2″ of 1×1 twisted rib looks really nice, but 2×2 rib is my favorite.

For cuff-down afterthoughts (my favorite) – Use high contrast waste yarn to mark heel and knit more than the usual waste rows.
Use gap-less method.
After heel or waste yarn, knit 5.5″ from waste yarn to toe decreases

For traditional gusset heels– knit 3 7/8 ” from gussets to toe decreases.

Toes:
I prefer binding off at 24 stitches for a less pointed toe.
Either a rounded decrease (as per Smooth Operator) or traditional Kitchener.  I usually reinforce the toe as I weave in my ends.

And that’s it… The year of the sock is officially over.  2017 will be the year of whatever I feel like I wanna do.

And now I’m putting my size 0 needles away for a looooooong time.  I might, just maybe, try to knit some of the sock patterns I used last year in worsted weight yarn for stockings (like Tracie of The Grocery Girls).  But only if I feel like it.

Oh, and happy New Year, bloggy friends!!

(more on Ravelry, Kollabora, Instagram, and Flickr)

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Vintage Christmas Socks

These were my supposed to be my Christmas socks, but I didn’t finish them until several days after Christmas, which was totally fine since I have been wearing running shorts and t-shirts this week.  But when it get’s cold, these will definitely ge…

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So Many Socks

I fought the urge to add a blech to the post title because I wouldn’t want to make it seem as though there was anything wrong with the pattern or yarn I used.  They are completely perfect, really.  I love Gynx Yarns self-striping.  She i…

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Fireside Pullover and Almost Camping

Remember how I dealt with envy when reading Within?  Well, I now have part of the makings of an outdoorsy, campfire, cozy story of my own.  This is Jane Richmond’s Fireside Pullover.  Love!Once I had my sweater finished, I planned to wea…

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Goldfinch in Targhee

I’m unusually proud of this shawl.  Maybe because I didn’t play it safe in my color choices.  The mix of these colors may be a no big deal to you guys, but for me to buy them online, in an indie-yarn, specifically for this shawl was a little …

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OD’ed on Sock Knitting So Let’s Think of Something Else

My husband asks what on Earth a pair of socks has to do with space.  I try to explain I’m losing enthusiasm for my sock challenge and I’ll take any motivation I can find. It’s true.  I’m so ready for the BoxoSox Knit-along to be over.  Y…

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Waiting for Rain and a Confession

Let’s just focus on all the good stuff first and save the tragic bits for the end, okay?  So, here’s my Waiting for Rain shawl, knit in the most beautiful single merino yarn from Swift Yarns- the most beautiful yarn.  I knitted this with the …

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Within Inspires Envy

Let me just get right into Within by Shannon Cook and Jane Richmond.  As you’d expect, it’s full of things I want on my body when it’s cold, beautiful photography, and charts to make choosing a size foolproof. What I didn’t expect was to find myse…

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Tiny Hits of Visual Joy

You can only knit so many blue, green, and grey sweaters before you know it’s time to move on and try something new.  Of course, in my case, I outgrew them over the last couple of years and so I can start all over knitting blue, green, and grey sw…

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Proud Owner of a Campside

It is exactly a year since I cast on, but I did finish my Campside shawl, by Alicia Plummer.  You know what I’ll say next, things like “love”, lots of “really”s, and maybe an “interest” or two.  I can’t help it, I’m almost always excited abou…

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Laura + Maddy

If you are like me and need a palette cleanser between your sweaters or monster shawl projects, then you’ve got to knit these.  The Laura + Maddy Mittens, by Teresa Gregorio, are one of the designs from the upcoming Great Northern book that s…

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I Love Lisette

I truly do.  Libby, of Truly Myrtle, is always cooking up some great design and Lisette is one of her newest.  I love it. It’s taken me too long to post about it.  First, it was a secret test knit, so I couldn’t.  Then, when it was …

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I Adopted a Thing and I Finished a Thing

If you know me from Instagram, you’ve probably seen the oversized puppy we’ve adopted.  I can’t help but take photos of her because she’s often in my face.  I’ll post about her later, because I think taking a stray into your home is wonderful…

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