Tag Archive: tutorials

Curvy Pattern Tutorial: Sew your own Geneva-inspired Dress

If you’re anything like me, you’ve been eyeing that Geneva dress from Universal Standard and wondering if it’s worth the money. I’ve heard from several reliable sources that they’re wonderfully made, that the jersey is awesome, and I love the company for their policy of letting customers exchange their garments for a new size for…

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Floral Sundress with Free Pattern

Sew a dropped waist floral sundress with big pockets - tutorial and pattern by Melly SewsHey y’all – aloha! Today I’m sharing this floral sundress that was my last minute travel sewing for this vacation. Once upon a time, before we had kids, the Coach and I took a trip to Hawaii and fell in love with the state. And we returned every summer…but then we had the boys. We Read the Rest…

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Video: Holiday Ornament Quilt

This post contains affiliate links. Read the full disclosure here. I’m back with another video! This time it’s for a fantastic holiday quilt called ‘Hanging Out with the Homies’. The quilt uses fabrics from Tula Pink’s fabric line, ‘Holiday Homies’. It’s a beautiful red-and-green wonderland of prints and my favorite are the animals wearing holiday sweaters! […]

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DIY tie front cut-out dress or swim coverup refashion

Instructions: *Try to find a shirt thats a little thicker so you it isn’t too see through! 1.Seam rip our cut off any pockets sleeves and collars. 2.Turn the piece inside out and line up a skirt on top plenty of room all around because the skirt half will be more A-line shape and we

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Make Your Own Bias Binding

How to make your own bias binding - a cute detail to add to your homemade clothes - Tilly and the Buttons

Want to add a pretty detail to your homemade clothes?

Bias binding is useful for creating a neat finish on seams that aren’t attached to anything else and don’t have a facing – for example, the armholes below the cap sleeve on the Etta dress. The bias cut will allow the binding to stretch slightly, which is handy for getting around curves such as armholes and necklines.

You can buy ready-made bias binding relatively easily. But it’s good to know how to make it yourself so you can make it in a print, colour and width of your choice. Homemade binding is one of those details that can make your handmade clothes truly special.

Here’s how to make it…

How to make your own bias binding - a cute detail to add to your homemade clothes - Tilly and the Buttons

You’ll need a large piece of fabric – a light- to medium-weight woven cotton will be fine. I’m using a Liberty print Tana cotton lawn. You’ll also need a bias binding maker for the method I’m going to show you. You can get these handy tools in different sizes – I’m using a 12mm (1/2in) one (this is an affiliate link), which will make single fold bias binding that is 12mm (1/2in) wide once finished. This size is perfect for binding the armholes on the Etta dress.

If you want to make double fold bias binding, for example to bind a neckline edge where you want the binding to be visible on the outside as well as the inside of a garment, you’ll press the single fold binding in half after it comes out of the maker. So you’ll end up with 6mm (1/4in) wide binding with a 12mm (1/2in) maker.

How to make your own bias binding - a cute detail to add to your homemade clothes - Tilly and the Buttons

Fold your fabric on the bias grain, in other words, at a 45° angle to the selvedges, so the selvedges are lined up with the crosswise grain. Use a ruler or pattern master to draw strips parallel to the fold, the width being double the width of the maker you’re using – or just a teensy bit under to leave a gap between the raw edges. So I’m drawing mine 23mm (just shy of 1in) wide.

How to make your own bias binding - a cute detail to add to your homemade clothes - Tilly and the Buttons
How to make your own bias binding - a cute detail to add to your homemade clothes - Tilly and the Buttons

Cut along these lines to create your strips – if you have a rotary cutter and cutting mat, it’ll be much quicker than scissors! Cutting the strips on two layers of fabric means you can cut two strips at once. Make enough strips so the total length is a bit more than you need for your binding. For the armholes on the Etta dress, you’ll need 1.2m (1 3/8 yards) of binding.

How to make your own bias binding - a cute detail to add to your homemade clothes - Tilly and the Buttons

Cut the ends of each strip so they create a right angle. Place one strip over another so the ends are right sides together at a 90° angle. Imagine the area where the two strips cross is a square – now use a chalk pencil or washable pen to draw a diagonal line across this square, creating a triangle shape at the outer corner (see pic above!). Stitch along this line to join the strips, back tacking at each end.

How to make your own bias binding - a cute detail to add to your homemade clothes - Tilly and the Buttons

Trim the triangular outer corner, leaving a 10mm (3/8in) seam allowance. Press the strips apart and press the seam allowances open. Do the same thing with the other strips until you have one long strip.

How to make your own bias binding - a cute detail to add to your homemade clothes - Tilly and the Buttons

Lay the strip wrong side up on an ironing board, and turn your iron on. With the bias binding maker flat or metal side down, feed one end of the strip through the wide end of it – you may need to poke it through with a pin or small scissors. Pen pull the maker away from the end and folded fabric should come out the other side. Checking the raw edges are centred, follow the path of the maker with your iron, pressing the binding as it comes out of the maker to set the folds in place.

How to make your own bias binding - a cute detail to add to your homemade clothes - Tilly and the Buttons

This is your finished single fold bias binding, which you can use when you’re stitching the binding to the inside of a garment.

If you want to make double fold bias binding – which you can use to bind an edge, showing on both right and wrong sides – simply fold it in half lengthways, with the raw edges on the inside of the fold, and press.

And that’s it! Now you can attach your binding to your lovely garment. Pretty!

PS. If you liked this post, you might also like Finishing a Facing with Bias Binding and Sewing on the Bias

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EMERSON PANT HACK

As much as I love the Emerson pattern as shorts and crop pants, it works really great as a full length pant as well. And with just a few easy hacks it’s really simple to do. The best part of it is that when my daughter gets too tall for these I can just hem them into the original length of crop pants or shorts to get more wear out of them. The pants above are just a simple wide length pant, which my daughter loves. I used a zebra print crepe fabric that you can find here. It’s a fun print and the fact that the fabric has great drape really works well for the wide leg style. And the pants above are more of a genie style by adding elastic to the ankle. I think they turned out really fun in this denim chambray, although I think next time I will try them in something softer for a more subtle affect. You are going to need to cut your pant leg pattern pieces longer than the original crop pants. For my daughter I added about 8 inches which included the 1 inch for the elastic, 1/4″ for turn […]

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Sewing a Band Collar // Kalle Sewalong

How to sew a band collar or stand collar // Kalle Shirtdress Sewalong // Closet Case PatternsOur sewalong for the Kalle Shirt & Shirtdress pattern is drawing to a close. Later this week we will cover

You’re reading Sewing a Band Collar // Kalle Sewalong by Closet Case Patterns. If you’ve enjoyed this post you can also follow us on Instagram , Twitter and Facebook.

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how to make a tank out of a t-shirt pattern

Just in time for summer and hot weather, learn how to turn the Oliver + S School Bus T-shirt into a tank top with this easy tutorial.

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Beach Maxi Dress

Beach Maxi Dress - Ruffled Maxi Dress Beach Cover Up - So Simple to Sew - Melly SewsHey y’all, today I’m sharing how to make this super easy beach maxi dress. I think this post may also have set a record for how far in advance I prepared it. Last November I attended a blog conference in Jamaica, and I knew that I had to make a sundress for this series for Read the Rest…

The post Beach Maxi Dress appeared first on Melly Sews.

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How to Use a Ruffle Foot

How to use a ruffle foot to make ruffles - how to sew ruffles - Melly SewsHey y’all – today we’re going to take a brief departure from specific sundress posts, so that I can instead cover a specific technique that I used on the Ruffle Strap Pinafore dress shown below, and is useful on so many other dresses, and that is how to use a ruffle foot to make your Read the Rest…

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Video: Easy Leather Hobo Bag

This post contains affiliate links. Read the full disclosure here. I’m back with another YouTube video – this time, it’s a full step video to make an Easy Leather Hobo Bag! This bag can be made in any material that can be left raw (so think cork fabric, vinyl, or leather), and it’s aimed at beginners […]

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Sewing Super Sharp Collar Points // Kalle Sewalong

How to sew sharp collar points // Closet Case PatternsThis week we are talking about installing the collar for our Kalle Shirt & Shirtdress. I am going to show you

You’re reading Sewing Super Sharp Collar Points // Kalle Sewalong by Closet Case Patterns. If you’ve enjoyed this post you can also follow us on Instagram , Twitter and Facebook.

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Ruffle Strap Pinafore Dresses with Free Pattern

Sew a Ruffle Strap Pinafore Dress - Apron Dress for Girls - with free pattern and video tutorial on Melly SewsHey y’all, today I’m going to share how to make this ruffle strap pinafore dress and I’ve got a free pattern for both the 0-3m size and the girl’s size 5. Ever since I made my nieces matching Easter dresses, I’ve been wanting to sew another matching set for them, and this sundressing series was Read the Rest…

The post Ruffle Strap Pinafore Dresses with Free Pattern appeared first on Melly Sews.

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Tutorial: Adding a Pocket to Your Loulouxe!

Remember how I said I’d write a tutorial? Well, here it is!!

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Find Pattern Piece C (Skirt Back) and make it a full-sized pattern piece. As it is, it’s an “on the fold” piece. Make sure and mark your center line because that will be important later.
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Find a piece of fabric that is larger than the pattern piece.
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I used a 12-14” invisible zipper. You could also use a regular ol’ zipper too. Figure out where you want the zipper. You probably want it somewhere toward the top but do not go so high that you get right next to the seam allowances.
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Eyeball where you want the opening to be and make a nice, straight cut across the entire length of the fabric piece.
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This is where a ruler and rotary cutter are nice. Right now you are just eyeballing it. We’ll get precise later once the zipper is in.
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Install your zipper. Since I used an invisible zipper, I used my invisible zipper foot to install it.  I did not use any interfacing but this knit is pretty stretchy but also stable.
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Same thing but from the back.
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Here’s where we start getting precise. On your pattern piece, draw a perpendicular line where you want your zipper. Take your full pattern piece and put it on top of your pieced fabric.
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Now line up both edges of this horizontal line with your zipper. This ensures that your zipper opening will be straight across horizontally.
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Once you think everything is lined up, cut out your piece. Make you DO NOT CUT OFF YOUR ZIPPER TOP! You will probably need to unzip your fabric piece BEFORE you cut to avoid doing that.
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Cut out a second piece of fabric that will go behind your zippered piece. You can see here I basted my zipper opening closed. Otherwise, there is a the very real possibility that you will forget there is no zipper stop and pull your zipper head right off. Don’t do that, it’s annoying.
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Baste the two layers together and treat them as one piece for the remainder of the construction process. My serger dislikes going over plastic zipper tape, so I always also go over this seam with my sewing machine to make sure those stitches won’t come out. Also, if you are using a metal zipper you SHOULD NOT sew over it. You need to remove the zipper teeth.
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Here’s my skirt partially constructed. The only double layer is the one piece. Assemble the rest as stated in the directions! See? It’s EASY!!
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Sleeve Hacks

Hack a sleeve design - how to change the style of a sewing pattern - Melly SewsIf you have a pattern for a top, t-shirt, or dress with a set-in sleeve, changing up the sleeve style is a really easy way to make it look completely different. And there are tons of different options. Today I’ll show you a couple of them. First up we have the full short sleeve. I’ve Read the Rest…

The post Sleeve Hacks appeared first on Melly Sews.

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how to add belt loops

Learn how to add belt loops to any pair of pants, shorts, or a skirt. In this tutorial, Shelley demonstrates how to add belt loops to the Liesl + Co. SoHo Shorts.

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How to make a DIY babydoll top with tassels refashion

  />Supplies/Instructions: start out with a top that fits you will in the shoulders and chest, something to repurpose, pins, scissors, measuring tape, a few yards of tassels, thread and sewing machine 1.Cut off anything extra from your to-refashion piece, like an elastic waist band and fold in half. 2.lay the top folded in half

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how to make a jeweled neckline

Learn how to make a jeweled neckline. It looks gorgeous on the Oliver + S Building Block Dress. You’ll earn lots of cool mom points when you make this project!

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How to Sew a Knot Shirt

How to sew a knot shirt - turn any shirt (even a store bought one!) into a knot front shirt - sewing tutorial by Melly SewsHey y’all – today I’m taking a page out of my most recent pattern, the Austin Tee, and showing you how you can make any shirt a knot shirt by adding these tie front pieces. You can do this on a woven or knit shirt, and you can place the knot at center front, off Read the Rest…

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How to Line the Etta Dress

How to Line the Etta dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Sometimes it’s satisfying to spend a bit of extra time on your sewing project to get a super luxurious finish – particularly if you’re making an outfit for a special occasion.

Vanessa here today – I’m going to show you how to make and attach a lining to your Etta dress. You can also use this tutorial to line many other fitted dresses, including those with a fiddly kick pleat. A lining will not only give your dress more weight and a flattering shape, it also reduces static and twisting – so no tugging around an unruly garment!

How to Line the Etta dress - Tilly and the Buttons

When choosing a lining fabric, look out for something lightweight and drapey that feels lovely on your skin. Try acetate or poly satin (nice and cheap – but check it first as it can go a bit static), viscose (rayon) crepe de chine, silk satin or, if you really want to push the boat out, something like silk charmeuse. Tilly bought this lining fabric from A One Fabrics on London’s Goldhawk Road.

You’ll also need matching thread, some large pieces of paper to make a lining pattern, and the Etta lining template, which prints on one sheet of A4 or Letter paper:

I’ve sewn this version in a gorgeous quality red sateen – an easy-to-work-with fabric with a touch of stretch for comfort and a subtle sheen for glamour. You can get your hands on the same fabric that I’ve used as well as all the notions you need in our Etta sewing kits.

How to Line the Etta dress - Tilly and the Buttons

For ease, I’ll refer to the outside, main fabric that you’re using for your dress as the “shell”, and the inside fabric as the “lining”.

Start by making your Etta dress, except for:

  • Finishing the seam allowances – there’s no need unless you’re worried about the raw edges disintegrating, as they’ll be hidden by the lining – but do finish the skirt hem
  • Attaching the neckline facing, or finishing its lower edge
  • Hemming it
  • Sewing to the end of the angled seam of the kick pleat – finish sewing 15mm (5/8in) before the end. 

Trace a copy of these pattern pieces in your size, adding the notches and markings – front bodice, back bodice, front skirt, two back skirt pieces, front and back neckline facings. If you’re making the three-quarter length sleeves, trace that pattern piece too. If you’re making the cap sleeve version, you don’t need to trace a copy of the sleeve, as it’s self-lined.

Cut 25mm (1in) off from the bottom of the front and back skirt lining patterns. Don’t use the ‘lengthen or shorten here’ lines for this as you need the kick pleat to start at the same level on both the shell and the lining.

Shorten the sleeve pattern by 15mm (5/8in) using the ‘lengthen or shorten here’ lines. Take a look at the Etta fitting post for help shortening your pattern.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Cut 15mm (5/8in) off the lower curve of the front and back neckline facing pattern pieces.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Lay the front neckline facing over the front bodice, matching up the neckline and notches. Trace the lower curve of the facing onto the bodice. Cut the bodice along this line and discard the neckline facing. Repeat with the back bodice and back neckline facing.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Place the downloadable template onto the right skirt lining pattern piece, aligning the pivot points and hem. Stick or tape down. Cut away the excess so the kick pleat is cut out, except for the seam allowance on the short-angled seam.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Cut the bodice, skirt and sleeve pieces in lining fabric. If your lining is slippery, read Tilly’s tips on cutting and sewing slippery fabric.

Stitch all the darts on the bodice – and three-quarter length sleeve if you’re making it – following the instructions. Stitch just the first 25mm (1in) of each skirt dart from the waist down, leaving the rest open as a pleat. This will allow the lining to open up slightly as you move. Press them towards the centre.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Follow the Etta pattern instructions to stitch the front and back bodice, front and back skirt and three-quarter length sleeve lining pieces together. Do not stitch the back opening or apply interfacing to it. Press the seam allowances open and then towards the back. Press the hem up to the inside by 15mm (5/8in), press it up another 15mm (5/8in) and topstitch in place.

If you’re making the cap sleeve version, just stitch the bodice and skirt lining pieces together. We’ll add the cap sleeves later.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Fold the front neckline facing and front bodice lining in half widthwise and snip centres notches at the bottom of the facing and top of the lining. Lay the neckline facing over the bodice lining at the neckline, right sides together. Pin them together at the notches and shoulders. Ease together the rest of the curves and secure with plenty of pins. Stitch. Press the seam allowances down towards the lining. If you like, you can understitch the seam allowances to the lining, close to the seam line.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Attach the neckline facing – with the lining attached to it – to the neckline of the dress following the pattern instructions.

Stitch the short back edges of the facing to the zip tapes and back opening seam allowances with a 7mm (1/4in) seam allowance – an adjustable zip foot is useful here. Continue stitching down the back opening until you reach the bottom of the zip.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Turn the dress inside out and pull the shell away from the lining. Stitch the bottom of the back opening seam of the shell together using a 15mm (5/8in) seam allowance. Start as close to the bottom of the zip as possible, turn at the pivot point, then stitch the short angled seam of the kick pleat together, stopping 15mm (5/8in) from the raw edge.

Snip into the seam allowances towards the pivot point, being careful not to cut through the stitches.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Stitch the bottom of the back opening seam of the lining together using a 15mm (5/8in) seam allowance. Start 25mm (1in) below the bottom of the zip and finish at the pivot point.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Press the back opening seam allowances of the shell open, then press the kick pleats to the right hand side, aligning the hem edges.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

With the wrong side of the fabric facing up, stitch the left hand side of the shell and the lining together along the long seam of the kick pleat, right sides together. You will be stitching the side that you didn’t cut the section out of.

Press the seam allowances open, then press the lining just inside the shell so it won’t show from the outside.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Aligning the pivot points, stitch the shell and lining together on the other long seam of the kick pleat opening. With the wrong side of the fabric facing up, you will be working on the right hand side of the fabric and stitching the skirt piece that you cut the section out of.

Snip into the seam allowances towards the top of the stitching line, being careful not to cut through the stitches. Press the seam allowances open.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Snip into the seam allowances of the lining at the bottom of the back opening stitching line.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Reach in between the shell and the lining and pinch together the short angled seams. Stitch the two layers of lining fabric along the short angled seam of the kick pleat, starting at the bottom of the back opening stitching line and finishing at the pivot point at the top of the kick pleat.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Press the seam allowances open and then flat.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Pull the lining away from the kick pleats and fold the hem of the shell to the inside by 30mm (1¼in). Press and pin in place. Topstitch the hem with a 25mm (1in) seam allowance.

For the three-quarter sleeve version:

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Fold the raw edge of the sleeve shell and lining to the wrong side by 15mm (5/8in) and pinch them together at the folds. With your other hand, reach inside the dress and down the sleeve – pinch together the raw edges of the shell and lining and let go of the outside with the first hand. Pull the pinched sleeve hems inside the dress and out through the dress hem. Pin the sleeve hems together and stitch.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons
How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Pull the sleeve back inside the dress again. Turn the dress inside out and press the shell of the sleeve back on itself so that it folds to inside by 5mm (1/8in).


For the cap sleeve version:

Stitch the lining and shell together around the armhole with a 10mm (3/8in) seam allowance. Attach the cap sleeve and binding to the armhole following the pattern instructions.

How to Line the Etta dress - Tilly and the Buttons
How to Line the Etta dress - Tilly and the Buttons

And that’s it! You’ve lined your lovely Etta dress! Now you can feel super smug knowing that the insides look as pretty as the outside 🙂

Let me know how you get on and if you have any questions…

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How to Line the Etta Dress

How to Line the Etta dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Sometimes it’s satisfying to spend a bit of extra time on your sewing project to get a super luxurious finish – particularly if you’re making an outfit for a special occasion.

Vanessa here today – I’m going to show you how to make and attach a lining to your Etta dress. You can also use this tutorial to line many other fitted dresses, including those with a fiddly kick pleat. A lining will not only give your dress more weight and a flattering shape, it also reduces static and twisting – so no tugging around an unruly garment!

How to Line the Etta dress - Tilly and the Buttons

When choosing a lining fabric, look out for something lightweight and drapey that feels lovely on your skin. Try acetate or poly satin (nice and cheap – but check it first as it can go a bit static), viscose (rayon) crepe de chine, silk satin or, if you really want to push the boat out, something like silk charmeuse. Tilly bought this lining fabric from A One Fabrics on London’s Goldhawk Road.

You’ll also need matching thread, some large pieces of paper to make a lining pattern, and the Etta lining template, which prints on one sheet of A4 or Letter paper:

I’ve sewn this version in a gorgeous quality red sateen – an easy-to-work-with fabric with a touch of stretch for comfort and a subtle sheen for glamour. You can get your hands on the same fabric that I’ve used as well as all the notions you need in our Etta sewing kits.

How to Line the Etta dress - Tilly and the Buttons

For ease, I’ll refer to the outside, main fabric that you’re using for your dress as the “shell”, and the inside fabric as the “lining”.

Start by making your Etta dress, except for:

  • Finishing the seam allowances – there’s no need unless you’re worried about the raw edges disintegrating, as they’ll be hidden by the lining – but do finish the skirt hem
  • Attaching the neckline facing, or finishing its lower edge
  • Hemming it
  • Sewing to the end of the angled seam of the kick pleat – finish sewing 15mm (5/8in) before the end. 

Trace a copy of these pattern pieces in your size, adding the notches and markings – front bodice, back bodice, front skirt, two back skirt pieces, front and back neckline facings. If you’re making the three-quarter length sleeves, trace that pattern piece too. If you’re making the cap sleeve version, you don’t need to trace a copy of the sleeve, as it’s self-lined.

Cut 25mm (1in) off from the bottom of the front and back skirt lining patterns. Don’t use the ‘lengthen or shorten here’ lines for this as you need the kick pleat to start at the same level on both the shell and the lining.

Shorten the sleeve pattern by 15mm (5/8in) using the ‘lengthen or shorten here’ lines. Take a look at the Etta fitting post for help shortening your pattern.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Cut 15mm (5/8in) off the lower curve of the front and back neckline facing pattern pieces.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Fold out the shoulder dart on the back bodice. Lay the front neckline facing over the front bodice, matching up the neckline and notches. Trace the lower curve of the facing onto the bodice. Cut the bodice along this line and discard the neckline facing. Repeat with the back bodice and back neckline facing.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Place the downloadable template onto the right skirt lining pattern piece, aligning the pivot points and hem. Stick or tape down. Cut away the excess so the kick pleat is cut out, except for the seam allowance on the short-angled seam.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Cut the bodice, skirt and sleeve pieces in lining fabric. If your lining is slippery, read Tilly’s tips on cutting and sewing slippery fabric.

Stitch all the darts on the bodice – and three-quarter length sleeve if you’re making it – following the instructions. Stitch just the first 25mm (1in) of each skirt dart from the waist down, leaving the rest open as a pleat. This will allow the lining to open up slightly as you move. Press them towards the centre.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Follow the Etta pattern instructions to stitch the front and back bodice, front and back skirt and three-quarter length sleeve lining pieces together. Do not stitch the back opening or apply interfacing to it. Press the seam allowances open and then towards the back. Press the hem up to the inside by 15mm (5/8in), press it up another 15mm (5/8in) and topstitch in place.

If you’re making the cap sleeve version, just stitch the bodice and skirt lining pieces together. We’ll add the cap sleeves later.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Fold the front neckline facing and front bodice lining in half widthwise and snip centres notches at the bottom of the facing and top of the lining. Lay the neckline facing over the bodice lining at the neckline, right sides together. Pin them together at the notches and shoulders. Ease together the rest of the curves and secure with plenty of pins. Stitch. Press the seam allowances down towards the lining. If you like, you can understitch the seam allowances to the lining, close to the seam line.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Attach the neckline facing – with the lining attached to it – to the neckline of the dress following the pattern instructions.

Stitch the short back edges of the facing to the zip tapes and back opening seam allowances with a 7mm (1/4in) seam allowance – an adjustable zip foot is useful here. Continue stitching down the back opening until you reach the bottom of the zip.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Turn the dress inside out and pull the shell away from the lining. Stitch the bottom of the back opening seam of the shell together using a 15mm (5/8in) seam allowance. Start as close to the bottom of the zip as possible, turn at the pivot point, then stitch the short angled seam of the kick pleat together, stopping 15mm (5/8in) from the raw edge.

Snip into the seam allowances towards the pivot point, being careful not to cut through the stitches.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Stitch the bottom of the back opening seam of the lining together using a 15mm (5/8in) seam allowance. Start 25mm (1in) below the bottom of the zip and finish at the pivot point.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Press the back opening seam allowances of the shell open, then press the kick pleats to the right hand side, aligning the hem edges.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

With the wrong side of the fabric facing up, stitch the left hand side of the shell and the lining together along the long seam of the kick pleat, right sides together. You will be stitching the side that you didn’t cut the section out of.

Press the seam allowances open, then press the lining just inside the shell so it won’t show from the outside.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Aligning the pivot points, stitch the shell and lining together on the other long seam of the kick pleat opening. With the wrong side of the fabric facing up, you will be working on the right hand side of the fabric and stitching the skirt piece that you cut the section out of.

Snip into the seam allowances towards the top of the stitching line, being careful not to cut through the stitches. Press the seam allowances open.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Snip into the seam allowances of the lining at the bottom of the back opening stitching line.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Reach in between the shell and the lining and pinch together the short angled seams. Stitch the two layers of lining fabric along the short angled seam of the kick pleat, starting at the bottom of the back opening stitching line and finishing at the pivot point at the top of the kick pleat.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Press the seam allowances open and then flat.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Pull the lining away from the kick pleats and fold the hem of the shell to the inside by 30mm (1¼in). Press and pin in place. Topstitch the hem with a 25mm (1in) seam allowance.

For the three-quarter sleeve version:

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Fold the raw edge of the sleeve shell and lining to the wrong side by 15mm (5/8in) and pinch them together at the folds. With your other hand, reach inside the dress and down the sleeve – pinch together the raw edges of the shell and lining and let go of the outside with the first hand. Pull the pinched sleeve hems inside the dress and out through the dress hem. Pin the sleeve hems together and stitch.

How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons
How to Line the Etta Dress - Tilly and the Buttons

Pull the sleeve back inside the dress again. Turn the dress inside out and press the shell of the sleeve back on itself so that it folds to inside by 5mm (1/8in).


For the cap sleeve version:

Stitch the lining and shell together around the armhole with a 10mm (3/8in) seam allowance. Attach the cap sleeve and binding to the armhole following the pattern instructions.

How to Line the Etta dress - Tilly and the Buttons
How to Line the Etta dress - Tilly and the Buttons

And that’s it! You’ve lined your lovely Etta dress! Now you can feel super smug knowing that the insides look as pretty as the outside 🙂

Let me know how you get on and if you have any questions…

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Sew a Snappy Pouch - Genius! Use Metal Measuring Tape as a Pouch Closure - Glasses Case Tutorial by Melly SewsHey y’all – today I’m going to show you something so cool – how to make a snappy pouch using metal measuring tape for the closure. The first time I saw someone use this trick I knew I would eventually want to include it in a project. And when this post came along, it occurred Read the Rest…

The post How to Sew a Snappy Pouch & DiscountGlasses.com Review appeared first on Melly Sews.

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Here is a new, modernized spin on an 80’s skirt – the side ruffle knit  skirt perfect to dress up or down this upcoming season. Supplies + Instructions: All you need is 1.5 to 2 yards of light to med weight knit fabric that has good stretch. Make 2 rectangles or squares depending on the length

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Tunic or popover placket sewing tutorial // Kalle Shirtdress Sewalong // Closet Case PatternsToday’s post is all about installing a tunic or popover placket in your Kalle Shirt & Shirtdress (or any shirt

You’re reading Sewing a Tunic or Popover Placket // Kalle Sewalong by Closet Case Patterns. If you’ve enjoyed this post you can also follow us on Instagram , Twitter and Facebook.

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You’re reading How to Sew A Hidden Button Placket // Kalle Sewalong by Closet Case Patterns. If you’ve enjoyed this post you can also follow us on Instagram , Twitter and Facebook.

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